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  1. #11

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    Aug 2004
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    Here are the floor plan and pictures of the corner sink(s) in my garage darkroom built last year. The long "process" sink (37 1/2" wide) spans a 20 foot wall to the corner where it drains by tilit in both directions towards the drain pipe in the far corner. The smaller "wash" sink abutts the long sink and its drain feeds into a common drain coming from the long sink and into the house plumbing on the other side of the short sink wall (I was "lucky" there - you're main problem would seem to be the pump necessary to lift water to your existing drains. The contractor (...don't get me started) built the 2 sinks out of 3/4 inch marine grade plywood, glued and screwed. I waterproofed the sinks with several coats of (white) marine gel coat. The gel coat is difficult to get right so I would recommend other options (marine epoxy?)

  2. #12

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    Sep 2004
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    Toulouse, France
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    Quote Originally Posted by f64'ed-up
    Here are the floor plan and pictures of the corner sink(s) in my garage darkroom built last year. The long "process" sink (37 1/2" wide) spans a 20 foot wall to the corner where it drains by tilit in both directions towards the drain pipe in the far corner. The smaller "wash" sink abutts the long sink and its drain feeds into a common drain coming from the long sink and into the house plumbing on the other side of the short sink wall (I was "lucky" there - you're main problem would seem to be the pump necessary to lift water to your existing drains. The contractor (...don't get me started) built the 2 sinks out of 3/4 inch marine grade plywood, glued and screwed. I waterproofed the sinks with several coats of (white) marine gel coat. The gel coat is difficult to get right so I would recommend other options (marine epoxy?)
    Hi !
    What a luxury darkroom, with an AC ....
    Raising the sewer is actually easy ! In Europe one can find a self contained unit which plugs direct on the drain and with a floating switch activates a pump which is able to lift the sewer 10 m high and pulse it 50 m long... the exhaust tube is 32 mm dia, so it is easy to route, and cheap...
    In my camera club, at its previous location we had a huge sing made of plywood reinforced with fiber glass tissue glued with epoxy resin. This sink resisted 40 yes, 40 years of common use and abuse by the children one afternoon every week (kids above 10 and under 17) So I plan to make mine using the same technique ;-) it will survive me, I think !
    My only difficult problem is piercing the basement wall for a plastic tube of 100 mm to route the fresh air. (I forgot to ask the contractor, which has made one hole, for exhaust, but did not know I needed to let air in, also...)
    Anyway, I'm impressed by the innovation people place in their darkroom !
    Thanks for your help !

  3. #13
    blansky's Avatar
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    Nov 2002
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    Wine country in Northern California
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    Some people just put an air vent in the door for the inward flow of air.

    http://www.calumetphoto.com/ctl?ac.u...+vent&x=18&y=4

    Michael

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    Some people just put an air vent in the door for the inward flow of air.

    http://www.calumetphoto.com/ctl?ac.u...+vent&x=18&y=4

    Michael
    Yes, I know... But my door is heavy steel and is under the ground level (the darkroom is in the basement) so I think I've better way to drill a 4" hole in the concrete...
    Anyway, thanks Michael !

  5. #15

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    Aug 2004
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    Georges,

    The AC unit is a small, cheap, split-type with no outside vent. I hear they're very common outside the US. It is very quiet and allows me to keep the temperature inside at 20C conveniently to speed processing of prints and film. Fresh air is a different story, as you've discovered. I achieve this semi-passively with a large Doran exhaust fan over the sink and a fresh air entry in the ceiling "piped" to an ouside wall. Air is "pulled" into the room by the exhaust fan. The Doran is extremely noisy so I have installed a variable speed fan switch to control its speed (thus noise) when large air transfer is not required. Another point about the split-type AC is that very few US AC installers know how to install them correctly, so finding appropriate installation can be much more expensive than the cost of the unit.

  6. #16
    Buster6X6's Avatar
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    Nov 2004
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    London Ontario Canada
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    Hi Georges
    My sink is in the corner of the basement and water has to travel about 30ft.to the main drain.So from your sink you have to have about 2% fall to the main drain and right after "P" trap or as close as you can you have to have vent for the drain to work usually vents go to the roof but you can use cheater vent.Right outside of the wall I installed "Y' coupling and straight pipe up about 3ft, vent cap.Down at the other end the main drain 4" pipe cut it install 4"x11/4" coupling .You can join all this with rubber couplings because main drain is not flexible.So you don't have to have a pump to get rid of the water. Hopefully this helps.
    Regards Greg
    Looking is a gift, but seeing is power.

    Buster6X6

  7. #17

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    Sep 2004
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    Hi greg !
    No, your system is un practical for me. My drain is about 5 ft ABOVE the sink ! So water won't flow upward ....
    By now, I've made the hole in the concrete wall to pick up air, and planned the pipe installation for bringing air from this hole to the darkroom. I am designing a filter box and a light tight fan to put air in the darkroom. I have to find a second fan, weaker than the previous one to suck air from the above of the sink, to the exhaust hole in the wall the contractor has made. This way I'll have a positive pressure in the darkroom preventing outside dust to come in ...
    Planning is as follow :
    Floor and wall painting (floor using a highly resitent paint made for industrial garage or car shops. Ligth yellow. Walls and ceilling pure white, a paint designed for bathrooms. Walls around the enlarger flat black to reduce printing flare, even if my Laborator 1000 does not leak light)
    Electrical wiring. Using apparent tubes and a highly sensitive ground fault interrupt switch at the main line...
    Lightproofing (entrance door need some work, access doors to others parts of the basement need to become air tight.)
    Sink, and others furnitures building.
    Plumbing , including the sewer and water panel construction. I'll have a small water heater to have some hot water to raise a bit water temp in winter (for wash water)
    Moving all my stuff inside, and print, print, print ! Yes !
    Planned difficulties : find a car to go shopping for the plywood panels... I'll ask a friend of mine which owns a truck ;-)
    BE able to wait for paint to dry, and fiberglass and epoxy paint to cure ;-)
    As I've already done a lot of DIY work (including the roof of my house ) I think I'll be able to complete this work. But how long will it take ? Dunno .
    Thanks for all your ideas, help and support !
    I'll keep you posted !

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