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  1. #11
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Make sure you don't have the neutral density filter applied, if your enlarger has one.

  2. #12

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    "Start out with no filters" THE best Idea. Dan

  3. #13

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    Thanks for all the pointers, everyone. Using all of your advice, I was able to make some quite nice prints! The biggest change came when I removed the diffuser from my enlarger, installed the condenser and conical light integrator which converted it into condenser mode. MUCH better for me.

    My new 50mm lens showed up today as well. It's a Rodenstock Rodagon 50mm f/2.8 that I won on the big auction site for $29.50. It's in GREAT condition and the lighted aperture values will come in handy in the dark. I can't believe I got it for so cheap. I'll have to make a few test prints with it later.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Natron
    Filters were set to: Yellow - 47, Magenta - 80, Cyan - 0.
    Any equal amounts of Y and M in VC printing ends up being neutral density, and it is often used to speed match filter settings.

    If you want to get the shortest printing times, then don't add any neutral density. So if the recommended filter setting is 47Y + 80M, then simply subtract out the value for the filter setting that is the smallest. In this case, subtract 47 from 80, and then you sill get a filter setting of (0Y) + 33M. So just use 33M and that will be equivalent to your original settings, but it should print about 1.5 stops faster.

    Kirk - www.keyesphoto.com

  5. #15

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    Oh thanks, Kirk. That makes perfect sense.. I'll be using that. Is there a table of the difference values that equal the contrast grades?

  6. #16
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Keyes
    Any equal amounts of Y and M in VC printing ends up being neutral density, and it is often used to speed match filter settings.

    Kirk - www.keyesphoto.com
    Isn't it true that equal amounts of cyan, yellow and magenta give neutral density? That's why one of the three, usually cyan, is set to zero, whilst the other two are varied.

    Kevin

  7. #17

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    Dear Kevin,

    In b&w printing, (this is a simplified explanation) there is a high contrast emulsion sensitive to blue light and a low contrast emulsion sensitive to green light. Adding magenta (the complement to green) makes the light less green so that emulsion is not exposed as much and the high contrast emulsion becomes dominant. Adding yellow makes the light less blue making the low contrast emulsion more dominant. Adding Cyan affects both emulsions roughly equally (it makes the light more red). It becomes a neutral density filter in and of itself. In color printing, adding cyan affects the color cast because the paper is sensitive to the full spectrum. All 3 are required to act as a neutral density filter in color printing.

    Neal Wydra

  8. #18
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    Equal amounts of cyan , magenta and yellow will create nuetral density,
    I would agree to start with O filter on the magenta and 0 on the yellow, with of course the cyan at 0.
    I would only use the magenta for increasing contrast and only use the yellow for softning contrast
    For every unit of magenta you will get a reduction in light power.
    going from 0 magenta to 30 magenta = one stop of light output
    the yellow filter hardly affects density
    10 unit change of magenta +/- 1/3 stop density difference

    therefore the advice to take out the magenta will help unless of course you indeed need the increase in contrast that increasing magenta # will give you.
    You may have other factors creating your long exposure dilemma, possibly a old bulb, or as others suggest an overly dense negative with a large magnification .
    Or a very slow lens.
    hope this helps

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neal
    In b&w printing, (this is a simplified explanation) there is a
    high contrast emulsion sensitive to blue light and a low
    contrast emulsion sensitive to green light.
    Those two emulsions have puzzled me. AFAIK VC papers have
    no more silver per unit area than graded. Yet as little as half
    the silver is used to make, what appear to me, very good
    images. Explain that. Dan

  10. #20

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    Dear Dan,

    You are now treading on sacred ground.<g> The argument that "more silver makes better images" has been raging for some time and I'd rather not get involved. I happen to believe that the folks at Fuji, Ilford, and Kodak (notice the alphabetical order ;>)) know what they are doing. So far whenever a photo has not come out well I haven't had to look far for the culprit.

    Neal Wydra

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