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  1. #1
    jd callow's Avatar
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    DIY Single Phase, 20 AMP 220 Circuit

    Good Day all. As the title states I need to put in a Single Phase 220 circuit. Any tips or instructions are requested and appreciated.

    The outlet will be 25' from the box and be connected to an RA print processor.

    [SIZE=2]As an aside. I did a search and came up with a link to a forum asking the same question. The first 6 or so answers were all of the 'Why do you need it' or 'you cant do it' type. I thought OMG idiot responses are not the sole property of photo.net. The 7th or 8th answer was 'I am also in need of knowing how to do this...' The question remained unanswered. [/SIZE]

    *

  2. #2
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    To the best of my knowledge all you need to do is buy a 220 breaker which will straddle both bus bars in the breaker box. This should be 1 phase 220 power. Three phase 220 is the hard one to get in a house, from my memory. But I'm not an electrician, so don't kill yourself with my advice.

  3. #3

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    I agree. But don't listen to me either

    Mike

  4. #4
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcallow
    ... Any tips or instructions are requested and appreciated.
    I would suggest an actual electrician. However, I must admit I wired my darkroom and have done much other stuff.

    At least invest in a DIY book on basic wiring. It will have diagrams of most simple circuits and should steer you the right way.

    Be careful!

    Cheers

    David

  5. #5
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I got to second guessing myself after I posted and did a bit of google searching. This site http://www.pipeorgan.org/service/man...electric1.html describes it pretty well, though it is for pipe organ building. It looks as if I was actually correct.

  6. #6

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    As others have mentioned, you will need to buy a double pole breaker for your panel. Be sure to get the proper breaker since not all breakers will work with certain panels. Determine the amperage that you will need to supply. Some devices are identified in wattage. The formula for determining amperage is divide wattage by voltage. The result will be amperage. If you have total amperage of demand of 60 amps for instance, it would be normal procedure to install an 80 amp breaker. The reason is that you don't want the breaker nuisance tripping.

    Determine that the amperage demand of the new circuit does not exceed the amperage of the panel in which it is to be installed. The amperage design of the panel will be identified on the panel. Also determine that you are not exceeding the combined continual operating amperage of the panel into you are installing the new breaker. Providing this all is appropriate, the procedure is as follows:

    The procedure is to remove the panel cover and if necessary the sub panel cover. This will be the cover that actually covers the breakers once the main cover is removed on some panels. Locate an open space for a double pole breaker on the lug panel. The breaker is normally simply hooked under a retainer on one end and then snapped down onto the power supply lugs.

    You will need to run two power conductors of proper guage and a ground conductor. It is proper procedure to identify the power conductors in a 220/240 single phase circuit by using black wire for the power conductors and a green shielded conductor for your ground.

    The sizing for the conductors is as follows: 20 amp--12 guage, 30 amp--10 guage, 40 amp--8 guage, 60 amp---six guage, 80 amp--4 guage. The ground conductor will be 14 guage for 20 and 30 amp circuits. It would be 12 guage for 40 amp circuits and 10 guage for 60 amp circuits.

    The black conductors will be attached to each lug of your newly installed breaker and the ground conductor will be installed to the ground lug in the breaker panel.

    The ground conductor will be connected to the chassis of the device that you are wanting to power. The power conductors to the power taps of the device.

    Identify the breaker in the panel labeling location.

    This will pass code in most municipalities that operate within the NEC. I have worked with this stuff for over forty years.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Gebhardt
    To the best of my knowledge all you need to do is buy a 220 breaker which will straddle both bus bars in the breaker box. This should be 1 phase 220 power. Three phase 220 is the hard one to get in a house, from my memory. But I'm not an electrician, so don't kill yourself with my advice.

    There is no three phase service supplied for residential service.

  8. #8

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    This is probably a stupid question, but don't you need a neutral (white) going from the device to the neutral bar on the breaker panel as well?

  9. #9
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    Hi John
    I will let Peter Illidge my tech guy here answer this one,

    The electrical codes in US are a little different than here but I will give you the basics. For a twenty amp processor you will require # 10 BX cable( Also known as metal sheath cable.) If you have a breaker box you will require a double 20 breaker also called a two pole breaker. Make sure that it is same as the company that manufacture the box. (For stabloc use there breaker . There is no universal breaker they are all unique) The bx cable that you purchase can be 2 conductor plus ground, or three conductor which will have a red,black and white wire. For 220 single phase black and red are the hot lines white is not used.
    If you opt for the two conductor you must wrap the white wire with black tape to indicate that both conductors are hot. I beleive that this is international code. If the processor comes with a plug on the end, be sure to get the matching receptacle. otherwise you can hardwire it. The former is prefered. You can run the cable yourself through the joists and up to the breaker panel.Leave at least four extra feet of wire for inside the breaker panel. I would suggest that you get an electrician to do the hook up in the panel. Lethal current is present in the panel, Also certain states require that the wire inside the panel be routed a certain way. I hope this helps you out If you have any other questions feel free to ask. I would also recomend the electrician do the hard wiring to the processor. It can sometimes be confusing
    Peter
    Ok john , hope this helps, running into trouble for the trip to detroit, may have to make it a bit later will call on the weekend regarding the other matters we have been discussing
    Bob

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt miller
    This is probably a stupid question, but don't you need a neutral (white) going from the device to the neutral bar on the breaker panel as well?

    No you do not...the only time that a neutral would be supplied is if you were supplying both 220/240 and 115 volt service. In that event, you would gain 115 volt by using one of the "hot legs" of the 220/240 volt service and the neutral.

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