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  1. #11
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimgalli
    Thanks for not being too rough on me....I missed the 12V in the title:~)
    Jim,

    Hope you took my response as intended, just a little light-hearted teasing. It was obvious to me that you'd just missed the header and mention of the battery, but I couldn't resist doing the joke, however lame. Can I claim this as a momentary lapse after showing restraint by never once having risen to Scarpitti bait?

    Normally, I would have added something constructive, like an answer to the question, but I was literally logging off to head in to work at the time.

    And keep posting the 240 G-Clarons. One of these times you'll hit me when I have the funds available.

    Lee

  2. #12

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    Hey Jim,

    Anyone who backs over small trees in his Bubba truck can't be all bad. Got to cut you some slack, as you're one of us!

  3. #13
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    No, your sealed, aka gel-cell battery won't vent, unless you seriously overcharge it and pop the safety pressure release. That, and their low cost compared to NiCd or NiMH, are why they're used for things like emergency lighting and similar indoor applications.

    If the electronics tech says you can use 20 gauge for a single fan, and 16 or 14 for the combined load, then any larger wire size (smaller number) will also work. As suggested, if you're going to be drawing 3 amps through the main wire (1.5 A times two fans, wired in parallel), you should certainly have something heavier than the 24 ga. that the fans use for their final pigtails. You should also include a fuse in series with the combined load, preferably about a half amp higher rating than what the fans will draw (so in this case, about 3.5 amp) -- that way, if something shorts, it'll blow the fuse instead of burning the insulation off the wires (a car battery can melt 4 gauge jumper cables, and even a gel-cell is capable of delivering more than enough current to melt pretty heavy copper wire, though your solder joints, if used, will melt first -- but the insulation will burn before solder melts, and it's pretty stinky stuff).
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  4. #14

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    Actually the combined is 1.5 amps. Each is 0.74 but close enough to 1.5 amps. I picked up 20 feet of 14 gauge wire for less then $2.50. The smaller wire wouldn't have saved enough to matter. Right now I've got everything but the bulbs and the wood. When I went to order the bulbs they were having one WEIRD phone glitch.

    I was thinking about a fuse but wasn't sure how important it was. I added a switch so I can leave the fans on intially to let the bulbs warm up.

    Now to just twiddle my thumbs while I wait for bulbs.

  5. #15
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    So what guage do I need then?

    Jane this place seemed cheaper then Canadian tire. Most of the stuff was even new -)

    It's a sealed battery is it still going to vent? Not much of an issue I can take it outside to charge. I figure the battery will only need charging about once a year. It's a wee bit bigger then the load really needs.
    Hi, joking aside, a battery needs to be kept near full charge, but not overcharged, to prolong it's life. Also it would self-discharge just sitting there.

    Jon

  6. #16
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Jon is correct -- the proper way to maintain a gel cell is to keep it on a low-current trickle charge continuously. I'd have to look it up to confirm, but what I recall is 1/100 of the battery's amp-hour rating is a good value for the trickle, so if you have a battery rated at (say) 20 amp-hour, trickling it at 0.2 amp would be just right for continuous maintenance. Better still is a charger with a sensor that will start and stop based on the battery's terminal voltage, but this is serious overkill for surplus gel cells -- the charger would cost you about $80, and you can replace the battery every 2-3 years for $20 a pop, most likely (if you're buying surplus, that is). Even a 0.1 amp trickle would probably be adequate in the low draw usage you envision; trickle charging in this range and not running the fans long enough to discharge the battery below, say, 80%, you should get a life of four or five years from a gel cell.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  7. #17

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    http://www.simmtronics.ca/page3z24.html

    That's the battery I got. Cost a little more then $10 US. I think I paid $14 Canadian. It's rated for main power which I think means it can handle charge/discharge.

  8. #18
    Calamity Jane's Avatar
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    I hate to contridict but a gel-cell, any lead-acid battery, should (ideally) be charged with a current-limited, voltage-regulated charger. A constant curret "trickle charger" is more suited to Ni-Cad batteries.

    If the voltage is not limited, the battery will bubble and loose liquid over time. Voltage on a 12 volt group is normally limited to 12.8 to 13.4 volts. The (charge) current is normally limited to 1/10 to 1/3 of the rated capacity.

    I have a number of gel-cell batteries that are pushing 30 years old and still truckin :-)

    BTW: I am a designer with a major electrical utility. Batteries and d.c. wiring are somewhat familiar to me ;-)

  9. #19

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    Canadian tire was nice enough to put a charger on sale this week. It's nicer then my old one so I picked it up. It includes a 2amp mode for small batteries and settings for sealed batteries.

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