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  1. #1
    eric's Avatar
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    What size paper do you use for 35mm contacts?

    Just wondering, I've been using 8x10 paper to contact 35mm 7 strips of 5 for a long time. 8x10 just barely fits. I used to do that cause my trays were 8x10. But now, I have a large Nova. Is 8 1/2 x 11 a common size for contact printing strips of 35mm? Or is this an outdated size paper?

    3 strips of 120 fits 8x10 pretty good though.

  2. #2
    Ole
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    I have always used 9.5x12, or 24x30 as it's called in Europe. A whole negative sheet fits nicely.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #3

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    I tend to use 8.5x11 for contact sheets since I found out I could order it. Really I would rather have something like Ole's 9.5x12, because in 35mm in particular the frames at the edges tend to get chopped off--8.5x11 is long enough but not wide enough for what I want. It's great for 120 tho.

  4. #4

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    I use 8x10 paper. 35mm film I cut into 6 strips of six, which just fit onto the paper. If I have a 37th or 38th frame, I contact print them on small cut pieces of paper, which I glue to the back of the 8x10. 120 film I cut into 4 strips of 3, which again fits nicely onto 8x10. By the way, I don't use a contact printing frame or whatever they are, I just lower a big piece of glass onto the negative and paper. I have put some black tape along one edge of the glass; this I use to cover the "negative-less" areas of the paper. Thus, I get a nice white space after developing, where I can write relevant stuff (I got this tip from the David Hurn book, "How to become a photographer").

  5. #5

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    Good Morning, Eric,

    A couple of years ago, I happened to spot a 250-sheet box of 8 1/2 x 11 inch Kodabrome II RC on E-bay and successfully bid on it. I've been using Kodabrome II RC for contact sheets for several decades, but in the 8 x 10 size. The slightly larger size makes things a lot easier whether you go with seven strips of 5 or six strips of 6. With a little cheating, it's also possible to get a usable partial contact of frame 10 from a roll of 120 film with 6 x 7 negatives. Standard 3-ring binders still work just fine, of course, for the processed sheets.

    Konical

  6. #6

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    I never make contact sheets. I can judge a negative better than a contact sheet.

  7. #7
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    I'm the same as Ooze. Negs cut into strips of six and printed onto 8x10. I guess it must be a fairly standard way of doing it 'cause my evening class had contact printers that took negs in strips of 6 and were just big enough for a sheet of 8x10!
    [size=1]the all new darkplanet photoblog[/size][size=1]
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  8. #8
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I have a confession.
    If I can find a dirt cheap, old, outmoded flatbed scanner with a full trasparency lid, I'd just throw my negs down on that simply to see a whole roll reversed to positive and for judging basic composition and content. I would probably never print them out but mark the negs for my next darkroom session.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  9. #9
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    We only use 8.5 x 11 paper for contacting (colour or black and white)
    All manufactures stock it , bit more money but worth the price by being easier to handle in the darkroom

  10. #10
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    I'm with Lee. Home darkroom time is limited and I never feel like wasting it on poof sheets. I've gotten pretty good at judging negs for the most part.
    One nightcollege I attended used a dry to dry machine. These are fantastic for contacts. In one class I processed 47 proof sheets. I also rarely do test strips for proof sheets.

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