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  1. #21
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Sparky
    be very careful with the copper tube system, have a filter very close to the end where you are spraying, I have worked in labs in the past with copper tubing for air line and every lens was coated with pits and oiled. A filter should be helpful.

  2. #22
    billschwab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky
    Anyway - any ideas about mating the copper lines with the right air fittings?
    You'll love it when it is done. I'm not sure about fittings, but I am sure you will have no trouble going back to hose as there are a million different compression type fittings out there. I would be sure to give it a good blasting to clean out the copper lines though. I would be concerned about left over flux from sweat soldering the fittings. Perhaps a filter before you go into the hose again would be best just in case. I used flexible air hose... and you're right... I wouldn't want to have to dig that stuff out again. I'm hoping to have moved by the time it needs replacing!

    Good luck with the project and new darkroom!

    Bill
    www.billschwab.com

  3. #23

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    I use makeup brushes -- they come in a container that looks like a large lipstick. Buy them in a dollar store for a buck apiece. I also use them on my cameras to clean the inside and also for lenses.

  4. #24

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    The absolutely best way that I have found after 30+ years of printing is to use a dust roller. These are rollers that attract dust and are then rolled over a sticky pad to remove the dust.

    I roll over my negative and no dust.

    I also roll the glas in my nagative cariier. I find these work better than Static-Master brushes and compressed air which only blows the dust around the darkroom.

    I also print 16x20 palladium prints from 16x20 negatives. The ONLy way to keep these puppies dust free is with a dust roller.

    Check it out at http://www.startpcb.com/items/dust_removal_system.asp


    My best
    Mike

  5. #25
    PeterB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkravit
    The absolutely best way that I have found after 30+ years of printing is to use a dust roller. .......Check it out at http://www.startpcb.com/items/dust_removal_system.asp
    Wow, those rollers certainly aren't cheap. Have you ever had any residue remian on the surface that you're trying to dust after using it?
    This product reminds me of the thing I use to remove dog hairs from my clothes and furniture at home ! Its a lint roller - just like fly paper on a cylinder, and you just tear a piece off when it loses its sticy-ness. (http://www.lintroller.com/australia/products.html)

    Although it may not be that great for use in the darkroom - since I imagine that it could release some adhesive where you don't want it to.

    Anyway, back to the darkroom topic at hand, personally I use compressed air and lint free tissues to clean my negs and the glass carrier plates.



    regards
    Peter Badcock

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