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Thread: Jobo users

  1. #1

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    Jobo users

    Hi,
    I am going to splurge for a cpe+. A friend of mine has a jobo, and I used it long ago to do some color. I will be doing mostly B&W 4x5 negatives in mine.

    The question is I read on the jobo site that fixer, and maybe stop bath will oxidise faster due to the rotary processing. I use powdered u mix fixer. NO rapid !. Storage life of used fixer is rated 30 days. Assuming the fixer capacity is not used up, I wonder how much less storage, life it has due to oxidising effect of rotary processing.

    Any comments on this ?.

    Jennifer

  2. #2

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    Jennifer,

    I suspect that oxidation rate is a function of the chemicals used. I've used a CPE-2 for the past three years and the only issue I've seen with regard to aerial oxidation is with pyro developers. Steve Anchell recommends adding 30% more of PMK solution A when processing in a Jobo. I've been using Rollo Pyro (ABC+ Pyro) which is formulated with ascorbic acid to make it specific to Jobo processing.

    Stop bath or fixer oxidation I've not encountered anywhere. I've used T-Max developer with acedic acid stop and Kodak Rapid Fixer, Edwal's FG-7, and now the Rollo Pyro with a water stop bath and TF-4 alkaline fixer. All this on 120 roll film. No problems at all -- except when the 1530 tank extension doesn't seat properly.

    My CPE-2, with a brand-new, factory-reconditioned lift is for sale; I bought a CPA-2 to replace it. Contact me off the list if you're interested.

    Rich

  3. #3
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    I use a 1500 and have had no troubles other than making sure it was perfectly level.

    S.

  4. #4

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    I use my jobo to process B&W film about 3 days a week. I replenish about 50-100 ml of stop and fix per roll or 4-4X5 or 1-8x10.

    The stop and Fix remain strong and in working condition.

    I hope that helps!

    Corey

  5. #5

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    I use Jobo tanks on a motor. Same sort of thing. I don't see any life shortening for fixer. B&W or colour. Maybe if you're using an acid fixer? But the neutral to alkaline fixers I use sure seem to last forever in the Jobo tank.

  6. #6

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    I never heard of fixer oxidation being a problem. In a Jobo or not. I use my fixer as a 1 shot in my Jobo expert drums though. 400ml, use once and discard. It's cheap enough and I never worry about exhausting fixer with the newer B&W films.
    Take care,
    Tom

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer
    Hi,
    I am going to splurge for a cpe+. A friend of mine has a jobo, and I used it long ago to do some color. I will be doing mostly B&W 4x5 negatives in mine.

    The question is I read on the jobo site that fixer, and maybe stop bath will oxidise faster due to the rotary processing. I use powdered u mix fixer. NO rapid !. Storage life of used fixer is rated 30 days. Assuming the fixer capacity is not used up, I wonder how much less storage, life it has due to oxidising effect of rotary processing.

    Any comments on this ?.

    Jennifer
    If you are processing 4x5 inch sheet film, you may find the use of the Jobo Expert Drums to be more convenient. I`m not sure if these are suitable for the CPE-2, so it may be better to buy the CPA-2 or CPP-2 processer instead, along with a Jobo Lift. Unfortunately, they cost a little more.
    Stop baths, Fixers, along with Developers, are cheap enough to be used as one-shot solutions with rotary processors, due to the smaller volumes of chemicals required, so no worries there.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott.
    If you are processing 4x5 inch sheet film, you may find the use of the Jobo Expert Drums to be more convenient. I`m not sure if these are suitable for the CPE-2, so it may be better to buy the CPA-2 or CPP-2 processer instead, along with a Jobo Lift. Unfortunately, they cost a little more.
    Stop baths, Fixers, along with Developers, are cheap enough to be used as one-shot solutions with rotary processors, due to the smaller volumes of chemicals required, so no worries there.
    Years ago, I bought a CPE and processed B&W with it. If you stayed there to monitor the temps, it worked will and produced excellent negatives. I spotted a "wounded" CPP on ebay and bought it. It isn't much to look at but it controls the temp and gives you a lot more flexibility. The expert drum system is not compatible with the CPE - that is reason alone to move up to the CPA/CPP level.

    I use a 1:9 dilution of TMax RS @75 degrees and use twice the amount recommended for the drum. My results are amazingly consistent and repeatable. If I have a variation in a negative, it is always something I have done. The development variable is completely removed from the equation.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by blaughn
    Years ago, I bought a CPE and processed B&W with it. If you stayed there to monitor the temps,

    I use a 1:9 dilution of TMax RS @75 degrees and use twice the amount recommended for the drum.

    Try this. Take a preheated tank and fill it with 75 degree water. Close the lid. Unless you're working in a freezer I bet it'll hold that 75 degrees for a long time. Without the processor. I've done the test with 100degree water and the 2500 type tank I tested held temp for over 10 minutes. I got bored and gave up at this point.

    The tanks are pretty good insulators. An advantage of plastic over metal.

  10. #10

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    It could well be the chemicals pack in quicker because of the small amounts that are used in a Jobo, eg: 600ml for 12 sheets 5x4 with a CPE-2. Going up to say 700ml wont be much better. One shot seems to be the way to go.

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