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  1. #11

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    mine has windows you open, but they cover the actual borders so you need to open the window (with a red filter in place or no paper in the easel) to locate the image accurately. Guess you could draw lines on the windows to indicate the correct framing to remove that step.

  2. #12

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    I also recommend a larger tray (I used 11x14 for 8x10 prints, 16x20 for 11x14, etc.)... to small a tray and you have problems with keeping prints separated, but more importantly, not enough solution. I used to do the prints back to back, stacked face-to-face (i.e. 2 prints back to back, 2 more on top, etc., etc.) and pull the bottom pair up from the bottom to top, and so on, with constant movement. I never wore gloves, was very careful about washing and drying my hands after every set.

    I did the same thing for larger prints, e.g., 8x10 and ocasionally 11x14. Take care and take your time.

    Earl
    Honey, I promise no more searching eBay for cameras.

  3. #13

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    Good Evening,

    Ditto on the multiprint easel. I also find no problem with two 8 x 10's at a time in 11 x 14 or 12 x 16 trays. With four 4 x 5's on each 8 x 10 sheet, the numbers add up fairly quickly.

    Konical

  4. #14

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    FWIW, some of you clearly have larger and more elaborate multi-print easels than I'm getting. Here's the one I won. It looks like it's designed strictly for doing 4-up on an 8x10 sheet. If I find it's inadequate for my purposes I'll look for something more elaborate or try another approach. If anybody else wants to try the same thing, I saw at least two other auctions on eBay for what looked like the same model, but I didn't save the auction numbers. (Both had higher starting prices.) Search on "easel" in the photo area and scan the results to find them.

  5. #15
    DKT
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    FWIW, some of you clearly have larger and more elaborate multi-print easels than I'm getting. Here's the one I won. It looks like it's designed strictly for doing 4-up on an 8x10 sheet. If I find it's inadequate for my purposes I'll look for something more elaborate or try another approach. If anybody else wants to try the same thing, I saw at least two other auctions on eBay for what looked like the same model, but I didn't save the auction numbers. (Both had higher starting prices.) Search on "easel" in the photo area and scan the results to find them.
    I may be wrong, but I don't think that particular model is for multiple prints. I've seen a similar saunder's easel like that, and it was making salon type prints--rather wide borders in fixed sizes.

    The Saunders Multiprint easel is a bunch different beast--I have one of these and they cost about 400 dollars new. It's the cadillac, or Rolls Royce of multiprint easels. It comes with a variety of masks from wallet through 8x10. The base of the easel is a large, fixed box--with two levers that move an easel mounted to a carriage inside--the levers move this to several preset click stops, depending on the mask size. This way--the base stays in the same place, but the paper moves around. Each time you move the paper, you can cover it up with the door in the mask, and go to a dim white-light to move to the next negative & refocus & make the exposure by flipping the door open and so on.

    Other multi easels, like the one made by Jobo, Premier etc--work in a simpler manner. You move the easel instead. I've used a couple made by unicolor, and they're pretty low tech but work just as well in many ways. I've also made quickie 2-up easels, by covering half of speed-ez with cardboard.

    You may be able to make another mask for that easel you have bid on though--the mask needs to have an offset opening for the exposure to made through. Instead of being centered, it needs to be in one corner. It needs to be flat on both sides, so you can flip it over and rotate it around as well to cover up the exposed areas as you make the next print. You also need some way to make the entire easel lightight as well between exposures, or you'll need to remove the paper and insert it in the proper orientation for the next negative.

    It's much easier to do this in a 2-up easel than a 4, if you try to make them yourself. You just have to keep track of the orientation of the paper.

    Hope this helps.

  6. #16

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    That sounds like my 16x20 easel. The only issues with mine are it moves left right on it's track but not forward/back. So you can do either the top half of the sheet or the bottom half of the sheet. Once you've done one half then you need to push the whole thing into place. The thing is huge.

  7. #17
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Just a little tip: if you are not so comfortable with developing many prints in the same tray at once, you can simply put 2-3 on the dev bath at the same time, then leave them in the stop bath to do another batch at once. Prints can handle to be left in the stop for a while without problems, and once they're all in there, you can throw everything in the fixer and shuffle to your heart's content. Precision in the fixing time is not crucial the way it is for developer.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by DKT
    I may be wrong, but I don't think that particular model is for multiple prints. I've seen a similar saunder's easel like that, and it was making salon type prints--rather wide borders in fixed sizes.
    Another auction for what looked like the same item showed a little use diagram. The idea is that an 8x10 sheet of paper is much smaller than the base of the easel. Depending on which corner of the easel holds the paper, the opening in the lid will expose a different corner of the paper. For instance, to make a print in the lower-right corner of the paper, you'd put the paper in the upper-left corner of the easel. You'd then shift the paper to the upper-right corner of the easel to make a print in the lower-left corner of the paper, and so on for all four corners.

    Of course, this all depends on the size of the unit; it could be that you're right and the thing's smaller than I'm assuming. If so, I've blown $18. I guess I'll know in a few days when it arrives.

    FWIW, I didn't find anything as elaborate as what you've described, either new at B&H or on eBay. Are such easels still being made? I'm certainly not willing to pay $400 for one, but I might keep my eye out on eBay if the one I ordered turns out to be inadequate.

  9. #19
    DKT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    That sounds like my 16x20 easel. The only issues with mine are it moves left right on it's track but not forward/back. So you can do either the top half of the sheet or the bottom half of the sheet. Once you've done one half then you need to push the whole thing into place. The thing is huge.
    Yeah--the Saunders (PR810) is big & klunky as well, built like a tank though.

    The Unicolor ones I have--they're made of plastic and I've had them for years. They were called mitchell picture boxes or something like that, and look kind of dorky, but they're actually pretty convenient to use, and they're small enough to move around on a tight baseboard.

    Both of them are basically plastic paper safes--with a sliding cover that fits over the top of these plastic inserts that cover the paper in sections for the various print sizes. These have a flush fit, so this cover slides over, and you can switch on the white lights (dim) to change out negs. The top of the inserts are flat white, the rest of the piece is black. I went ahead and labeled the inserts I use most, a, b, c, etc. to keep track of them, so I didn't make any double exposures.

    In use--you set up your image onto the white part--top--of the insert, cut off the enlarger, pull out the insert & make the exposure. Flip it over to the black side, and cover the paper up. Now--either put the lid back on & move to the next negative or slide the easel over top make another print of the same frame. Usually what I do is to focus on the back side--the borderless 8x10 format, since it's on the same plane as the other side. I then flip it over, pull the cover and frame it in place. This way--the light from the enlarger isn't on the full time--so you don't run the risk of getting any fog.

    You can mix and match the print sizes as well--just rearrange the little inserts. So, you can resize a neg and make a few wallets, a 3.5x5, 5x7 etc on the same sheet, or do them all the same size or print multiple negs etc. Sometimes if I'm unsure of an exposure, I'll flip it over and use the back side to make a little test strip, but most of the time I use the Saunders for this stuff--and I use a metrolux probe, or an EM10 meter to get the exposures roughed in. Coupled with a negatrans--you can make quick work of a roll of film for proofs....a second enlarger is pretty nice too, if you're really trying to crank them out.

    It's a pretty simple thing--wouldn't be too hard to make one of these easels, I actually gave away one of the Unicolors recently, you couldn't get more than ten bucks probably used for one. The Saunders--would be tough to make something like this. It's a really well made piece of equipment and would be a good investment if you plan on doing this a lot.

  10. #20
    DKT
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    FWIW, I didn't find anything as elaborate as what you've described, either new at B&H or on eBay. Are such easels still being made? I'm certainly not willing to pay $400 for one, but I might keep my eye out on eBay if the one I ordered turns out to be inadequate.
    here's a couple:

    http://www.jobo.com/joboint/products/vafoeasel.html

    http://www.tiffen.com/html/body_eas_5.htm

    Unicolor made them as well Premier. The Premiers were metal and were long contraptions with metal doors that flipped open. not the same as the Saunders, but more substantial than the plastic ones. Doran probably still offers one--check with Porters or some place like that.

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