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  1. #11
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Use the fan that ppl use to get rid of the smell. almost everyone has it
    Marko Kovacevic
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  2. #12
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    Hey Steve!

    After the workshop, I too am doubly motivated to improve my darkroom situation.

    My last darkroom was a converted bathroom, and I just opened the window and nailed a piece of plywood to the outside of the window sill with an exhaust fan and a switch mounted in the middle, and a light-tight louvre mounted on the fan (calumet purchase... I'll post a pointer if someone asks). This affair just plugged into the wall outlet.

    With regard to the local "no holes in doors" policy, it occurs to me that sheetrock is much easier to patch than a hole in a door. Perhaps you could cut a hole between two studs, build (as I know you're really handy with wood) a small box into which you can mount a second light-tight louvre and all the air for your darkroom would be pulled from within the house, and exhausted out thorough the window. No direct air from the outside coming in. When you're not running the fan, just unplug it and close the window. Someday when you move, you'll have a few nail or screw holes to patch and paint over.


    best of luck, and thanks for all the coffee!

    -KwM-

  3. #13
    Max Power's Avatar
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    As an additional comment,
    What I did in my DR was to take a regular bathroom fan and I built a plywood 'box' around it. I then wired in a switch and fed current through an extension cord. I then attached flexible dryer ducting to the outlet of the fan and ran that out of the darkroom. In this way, the fan is portable and can be placed virtually anywhere you need it to go. Join this with a piece of plywood in the window and you'd be all set.

    Kent
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

  4. #14

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    A window air conditioner with thermostat woulf be ideal. It may cost little more than an exhaust fan for darkroom work.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  5. #15
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    Ask your wife how long she plans to keep this husband?

    If you like the answer, ask her if she would consider a temporary replacement door with two holes. One with a fan in it exhausting the air from the bottom of the room, one with a filter box to clean the air coming in the top part of the room while blocking light. Many people make the mistake of drawing the fumes out of the trays, past their nose and out. Then put a seal around all four sides to keep out the light, dust and maintain the flow through the holes. Ask her what color she would like the door painted. When you move to a bigger place with a real dark room put back the original door.

    John Powers

  6. #16
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Would a standard bathroom ceiling exhaust fan work? Some can do pretty good volume, and have cubic volume exchange rates so you can figure minutes/complete air exchange. I'd also recommend looking for quieter models.

    Lee

  7. #17
    shicks5319's Avatar
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    Thanks to all

    Wow, I can't believe this thread came back to life. Lot's of good ideas here.

    Over the past year since I first asked the question, we have decided to move the darkroom out into my shop. Not quite there yet, but getting closer.

    New set up has ventilation built in. The next problem is the dust mitigation required. If it's not one thing it's another.

    Thanks to everyone responding.

    Steve Hicks

  8. #18
    kwmullet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shicks5319
    [...]
    Over the past year since I first asked the question, we have decided to move the darkroom out into my shop. Not quite there yet, but getting closer.
    [...]


    cool, steve. I didn't check the dates and assumed it was entirely a post-workshop thread.

    Makes sense to move your darkroom into your shop, what with all the contact printing frames and custom ULF cameras you'll be making. ;)

    -KwM-

  9. #19

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    Dear Steve,

    As a friend of mine said, the trouble was that the dust from his photography kept interfering with his woodwork...

    Any idea how long your branch of the Hicks family has been out there? Or why (hard rock mining was a popular reason)?

    Cheers,

    Roger W. Hicks

  10. #20
    shicks5319's Avatar
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    Ah, the Hicks clan

    Roger,

    The Hicks clan that I can claim started with a John Hicks from someplace called Southwark, London England. He ultimately migrated to the Long Island area of New York in the 1630's were his quaker descendents were shipbuilders for gnerations there until my great uncle lost the family fortune in the crash of 1929. Many of us were woodworkers of some kind.

    Thankfully my dad fell in love with a Douglas, Arizona girl and they compromised on New Mexico.

    I have never imagined describing that to a photography forum, but hey anything possible these days. Anyway, you and I might be related.

    Then again, there really are only about 5000 people on this planet. The rest of us are just relations of one kind or another.

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