Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 75,725   Posts: 1,670,150   Online: 654
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 36 of 36
  1. #31
    FrankB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Northwest UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,147
    Images
    24
    Ditto and seconded!
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

  2. #32
    hortense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Riverside, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    612
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Boenig-McGrade
    Any tips you may have to setting up a temporary darkrooms would be greatly appreciated, which will in the meantime will teach me what I need/want in my proper darkroom.
    Nicole - I have built 4-darkrooms, the latest with less space than previous ones. It is 8 1/2 feet long by 6 1/2 feet wide with an aisle 8-inches wide between the enlarging bench and the wet processing sink. This darkroom contains a 4x5 enlarger and a panel for associated controls, a 16 x 20 dry mount press, a molded plastic wet processing sink with enamel coated tin back splash, a wash sink I made out of 1 x 6s and waterproof plywood using water proof glue and coated with marine epoxy, fiber screen drying racks (2-levels that fold up against the wall or fold out for drying), drawers and cupboard, in-the-wall air conditioner. Plumbing was done with copper such that the entire assembly is bracketted to the wall to avoid internal wall plumbing and to facilitate any changes I might wat to make. I find it quite convenient. While the aisle space may appear narrow, it provide plenty of room and, in fact, is a convenience (all I have to do is turn around ...) However, I only have room to process 11x14 prints. A little more room would be required to do 16x20 prints. If you are seriously interested, I can send you a copy of the layout plan.
    [FONT=Times New Roman]MAC[/FONT]

  3. #33
    hortense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Riverside, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    612
    Images
    5
    A couple of more points, Nicole: The enlarger bench height should be such that you can rest you arms on it and the heighth of the wet processing sinks should be a height that will not stress you back. I also forgot to mention the in my wash sink, I have vertical washer that will handle 14-11x14 prints or 28-8x10s. Paint you inside walls whited with the exception of behind the enlarger. Arrange a curtain to pull around you and the enlarger to keep you enlarging area as dark as possible.
    [FONT=Times New Roman]MAC[/FONT]

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by hortense
    However, I only have room to process 11x14 prints.
    A little more room would be required to do 16x20 prints.
    I too was space limited. I abandoned multi-tray and
    adopted single-tray processing. That with one-shot
    chemistry eases processing. If I were a mind to
    I could do 20 x 24. Dan

  5. #35
    hortense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Riverside, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    612
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    ... running a mechanical hepa filter ...
    Sean, what's a "hepa filter"?
    [FONT=Times New Roman]MAC[/FONT]

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    I am not Sean of course. HEPA stands for high efficiency particulate air.

    In other words it removes very small particles from the air.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin