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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu
    A tube or A tray; whats the difference?

    Two biggest differences are the drum must be kept rotating and the volume of chemicals used. Drums don't work unless they're spinning.

  2. #12

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    Replenishment is the replacement of a chemical...replenishing it..based upon usage. The only factor I am aware of is the square footage of film/paper put thru the solution. Going to the Kodak web site should give you replenishment rates for RA4 developer and Bleach fix.

    Blix is short hand for bleach fix.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Two biggest differences are the drum must be kept
    rotating and the volume of chemicals used. Drums don't
    work unless they're spinning.
    I can imagine inversion would work well. I'm not
    familiar with the mechanics of affixing the paper
    in the tube. I've a 1 liter Kindermann film tank
    which might work without modification.

    I've found that with pre-wetting of the paper 4oz
    of fluid will do for 8 x 10 flat bottom tray processing.
    Twice that fluid volume is needed to secure
    archival results with one fix.

    Is 8oz of fluid possible with an 8 x 10 tube? I'd
    suppose 4oz is. I know some at least have much
    limited volume in the usual horizontal position. What
    are some typical volumes you've used? Dan

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu

    Is 8oz of fluid possible with an 8 x 10 tube? I'd
    suppose 4oz is. I know some at least have much
    limited volume in the usual horizontal position. What
    are some typical volumes you've used? Dan
    My 8x10 tanks do two 8x10s in 60ml of fluid. I use more just to be safe but that's the rated amount. I wouldn't want to use a drum inversion style. First the lid isn't designed to take that much chemicals. I think the lid handles maybe 400ml any more then that and you'd have to add the chemicals with the lid off. But the main issue is those tanks must take litres and litres to fill. The smallest film tank takes over 1 litre and it's maybe 1/3 the size of the 8x10 tank.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    .... But the main issue is those tanks must take litres and litres to fill.
    You've some specific tanks in mind. I've in mind a sealed
    bottom tank with tight lid. Roll up an 8 x 10, place it in
    a correct size tank, pour in 4 to 8 ounces of what's
    needed, pop on the cap and proceed to agitate
    by inversion. In my mind it's a no brainer. Dan

  6. #16

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    Unless it's in constant motion I'm having trouble with it working. With the tank rotated the chemicals are spun around the inside wall of the tank. So you only need enough chemicals to cover the paper thickness. Unless you're inverting the tank the whole time I can't see keeping the paper covered.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Unless it's in constant motion I'm having trouble with it working.
    With the tank rotated the chemicals are spun around the inside
    wall of the tank. So you only need enough chemicals to cover
    the paper thickness. Unless you're inverting the tank the
    whole time I can't see keeping the paper covered.
    A starting point for tube processing prints using inversion
    agitation might be:

    Slow continuous inversion with rotation, 3 minutes, using a
    Dektol type and strength developer one-shot at a 1:3 dilution.
    At 4 ounces per 8 x 10, 32 prints per quart or liter of stock
    can be done. I think that's about all that can be expected
    from that amount of Dektol type.

    If any one is interested I'll make some fix recommendations.
    I've no use for the method myself though it may the way
    for a few. Tube processing by inversion, without a
    rotary base, has, very likely, very limited use. Dan

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