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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calamity Jane
    Working on a light-trap door right now and they
    do take up a LOT of space.
    I think that "light-trap door" may be the same thing as the
    baffled entry which I mentioned. That be the case, I don't
    recall them taking "up a LOT of space". I recall an entry
    then a few feet of baffled space opening into the
    darkroom.

    If the room is organized for such an in the darkroom
    second wall baffle can be used. My tight quarters do
    not allow for a baffled entry. Dan

  2. #22
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I agree that a baffle entry is the best if you have a lot of traffic going from dark to light but it definitely eats up the floorspace. The darkroom where I used one was in a huge loft with a luxury of excess space and it worked great although for some strange reason, I was always disappointed that there wasn't a piece of cheese waiting for me at the end whenever I successfully negotiated it.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  3. #23

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    Not mentioned so far are the light levels of adjacent areas.
    When processing I leave only A or no light on in rooms on
    either side. I can imagine areas where a darkroom is, you
    might say, already in the dark or where hanging a brush
    aside fabric curtain is all that is needed. Dan

  4. #24
    Calamity Jane's Avatar
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    I just finished my "baffle entry" with 3 90 degree turns. It occupies 6x8 feet of floor space (which isn't a problem) and includes a "straight-through door" that can be used for moving large items or when the basement darkroom isn't in use - that makes it wider than a simple entrance. The entry is at the bottom of a stairwell that opens into a porch with a south-facing window and a west-facing door.

    I have checked it now in the a.m., at noon, and in the afternoon with the curtains and the west door open and I AM IMPRESSED! After sitting in the dark for 30 minutes, one can still not see ANY trace of light

    Never had a light trap door of any kind before and it is REALLY nice!

    (Did I mention that I decided to build the fancy entrance so my Hound can come and go without letting in light? )

  5. #25
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Aaah. So now you can get fresh dog hair for that "rustic" look in your images without having to deal with changes in light level and so forth, eh?
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  6. #26

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    [QUOTES=Calamity Jane]
    "I just finished my "baffle entry" with 3 90 degree turns."

    Even with the sun shinning directly into such an entry one
    is likely safe. That I wouldn't think be the case as common
    sense would require a blocking of direct sun light.

    The university I attended Physics Department's photo lab had
    1 90 degree turn; through the entry, take a right, and three
    or four steps after, in the lab. The entry was off a hallway
    which had a usual lighting.

    With a 30 inch entry and that much more wall baffle and
    that much wall to wall, 12.5 square feet would be needed.
    The inner wall baffle would not necessarily need reach
    the ceiling as long as the ceiling itself serves by
    color as a baffle.

    So, anyone who would like such an entry and have 12.5 or
    more square to spare can have one. For very fast light
    sensitive materials, if indicated, hang a brush aside
    fabric at the entry.

    "I have checked it now in the a.m., at noon, and in the
    afternoon with the curtains and the west door open and
    I AM IMPRESSED! After sitting in the dark for 30 minutes,
    one can still not see ANY trace of light."

    I'm sure you're light tight. A little reminder though: The
    light we see and the light films and papers see are not the
    exact same. Both films and papers are VERY sensitive to
    the deep blue, violet, and ultra violet. Dan

  7. #27
    Calamity Jane's Avatar
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    Having used the darkroom this afternoon for POP prints (exposed outside in the sun) and with the light-trap entrance at the OTHER END of the basement, I realized I need to install a safelight at the end by the entrance! I had no idea it would be so hard to walk a straight line 40 feet in the darkness . . . (we wont mention stubbed toes or bumping into walls!)

  8. #28
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Another thing you might consider, in case of the need to exit while working with faster and/or panchromatic materials, is installing glow tape to outline the door. The material can be quite dim and still show well to fully adapted eyes, especially if you avoid direct sun exposure for 24 hours before working in the darkroom.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

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