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  1. #21

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    Sodium vapor (yellow) kept to a low level is acceptable. The big ones with the doors that open on the top are not ok for a small home darkroom. Sorry can`t remember the brand.

    Osram or Duka are the ones you need. They are soccor ball size cut in half and are on a pivot so you bounce then off the ceiling.

  2. #22

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    Dear Game,

    There is a very good safelight from JOBO called the 5-star. There is a review of it in Shutterbug online somewhere (at least I think there is). Having said that, I process RA-4 in trays in complete darkness (I'm a cheapskate) without problem. I use an audible timer and handle the papers with one hand using an examination (~$10 for a box of 100). Once you overcome the fear it's really quite easy.

    Neal Wydra

  3. #23
    edz
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neal
    There is a very good safelight from JOBO called the 5-star.
    Its not from Jobo but Nova. Its basically a couple of yellow LEDs in a plastic box with a cable to a variable AC-DC power supply (to adjust the intensity). The rear of the "light head" has some velco to allow one to attach and fix it to well defined positions.
    The 5-Star is OK but doesn't produce much light. It is quite far removed from what I'd consider a viable darkroom illumination solution. It has its uses but, like the Jobo Minilux (and Minilight), only in conjunction with other lights.
    For functionality the sodium vapor lamps can't be topped. The Kaiser Duka and Durst Sanat lamps are "the best" but they both have one very significant shortcoming: they are designed around special very expensive spectral lamps. A NA10-FL (used in the Osram/Kaiser Duka 10/50 and NOT to be confused with the NA10 which is a very different bulb and even uses a different voltage) costs nearly 200 EURO. There is good reason then that Durst abandoned the Sanat (which when it was available was 600 DM without bulb!) and replaced it with a LED safelight: the Labolux (a very good lamp at a significantly lower price and without call for expensive bulbs).
    While the newer SOX-E bulbs (used in the Meteor-Siegen, Thomas and a few other safelights) are a small fraction of the price (and much more common) could have been used to design a new lamp with LED technology it clearly makes no sense.
    Is the Kaiser Duka better than any LED lamp for colour? Sure, but........ when one considers that for less than the price of a single spare bulb one can ......
    Edward C. Zimmermann
    BSn R&D // http://www.nonmonotonic.net

  4. #24
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Good points - when the lamp on my Duka goes I will be on to www.maplin.co.uk to order some Lumiled LEDs - 150 GBP for a new lamp is just not on. You can still find the Duka safelights on the auction site from time to time for a fraction of their new price; just be aware that when the lamp goes, you will be throwing it away!

    Cheers, Bob.

  5. #25
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob F.
    Good points - when the lamp on my Duka goes I will be on to www.maplin.co.uk to order some Lumiled LEDs - 150 GBP for a new lamp is just not on. You can still find the Duka safelights on the auction site from time to time for a fraction of their new price; just be aware that when the lamp goes, you will be throwing it away!

    Cheers, Bob.
    I've just binned two for that very reason. Note also that the LED type are cheaper to operate with a much lower waste heat output.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  6. #26
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by game
    Thanks for responses!
    I also read in the topic 'outofoptions' hyperlinked that one can use luminous tape to indicate places in the room.
    Game
    May be an idea. However, though I was initially oriented to purchase a Durst Sanat (which is the officially suggested lamp for Cibachrome / Ilfochrome Classic by Ilford while we're talking) I found out that a safety lamp is not needed that much.

    For most of the tasks, you don't really need your eyes even if you though you would. And when you really need to take a quick glimpse, turning on the enlarger for a while is more than sufficient. The pilot lamps of the head alone will let you walk around safely in most cases.

    After all, safety lamps for colour work are so dim that they don't make the difference, if you ask me, and they're painfully expensive.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  7. #27

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    Kind of my conclusion. Usefull topic I'd say.
    But I'll absolutally be using luminious tape.

    Game

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by roy
    The most used sodium safelight over here is safe providing that it is not too brightly set. (it is adjustable) It is always wise however, to carry out light checks as distance from sensitive materials is often critical.
    I think this safelight must be the DUKA 50 to which this reference is made. I can certainly endorse this. The guy at Nova Darkroom in the U.K. actually prints RA4 in a Nova quad tank with it. I bought one based on this but was still sceptical about it's light output until I tried it as I had a Durst safelight before which was practically useless.

    I was amazed. It's good enough to allow me to cut RA4 8x10 sheets down to 2x 4x5 and repack without fogging or none that I or my other viewers can see.

    A secondhand one was about £60 ($105) but well worth the cost. You can increase its intensity for B&W and the light output is then very good although if B&W was all I did then there are much cheaper lights with good output.

    It has a large face, almost like a small floodlight and I turn it towards the ceiling which bounces the light down for the whole room and hopefully decreases the chances of fogging as well a spreading the light more evenly. I believe there is separate cover for it for B&W but I have managed without such a cover for RC multigrade paper.

    Pentaxuser

  9. #29
    Robert Brummitt's Avatar
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    Dark!

    As a photo color lab rat for 20+. I learned that no light in a darkroom is best. We used small bits of glow in the dark tape to find things while working the enlarger and learn where the processor was when we needed to load the paper. You get very good night vision and feel like the "Mole men" from some old 50's movie.
    AAAHHHHH!!! Light!
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit"
    Aristotle

  10. #30
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    Color paper can be used with the Wratten series #13 safelight with a 15 watt bulb at about 4 feet for up to about 5 minutes. I use 2 in my darkroom directed away from the work area and it is sufficient to work by.

    The red lamps from my Jobo processor, digital timer and Enlarger are set to dim, and cause no problem.

    These lighting conditions are not good for any form of color film or B&W film.

    Infra Red illumination is quite safe for both film and paper, as long as the viewing light (green) that is produced by the phosphor that you view is not allowed to 'leak' around the viewing binoculars. They must fit your eyes tightly enough to prevent any sort of reflection into the room.

    PE

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