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Thread: Large Trays

  1. #21

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    Do the trays have to be in a sink? You could put the developer tray in the sink to control temperature and then put the remaining trays on tables. At my office I use small tables 2'x4' to hold trays for Pt. work.

    For really big prints, I use trays from home depot that are designed to put a washing machine in to prevent any drips from hitting the floor. They are smooth on the bottom and work well--albeit I have to double them up if I am using a lot of chemical. They are still much cheaper than "darkrom" trays made by the photographic suppliers.

    Allen

  2. #22
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    I appreciate all of the help. In the end, after buying 6 20x24 trays, I decided to use the Hey Loyd method of single tray processing.

    For 11x14 trays no problem. 20x24 inch trays are a little tricky but doable. I use 2 gallon chemical storage tanks in which I mix and store 1-shot chemicals and dump them back and forth into the tray.

    At first I thought that Loyd was an obsessive compulsive with infinite time on his hands. However, he is right that the method involves minimal print handling. I have zero problems with nicking the emulsion. I don't have any marks on the paper like I get when I use the Nova slot processor. It is easy to try a different developer for a change, etc. Also, it is the cheapest way to go.

    I have decided to use a more dilute fixer in 2-steps rather than a 1-step rapid fixer. I defer selenium toning to a separate session for the sake of time.
    Jerold Harter MD

  3. #23

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    With the larger prints, for me starting at 16 X 20, real estate for trays seems to be the problem initially but after processing, I came to realize that paper handling was the issue. The crimped-damaged print is the biggest problem I have with large prints and stacking trays sounds great but, for me, severly hampers the ability to handle the big paper.

    When you start laying out the ultimate solution for large paper processing - keep this in mind. It will save you from the pain of tossing out 75% of your finished prints due to paper crimps. Of course, I realize I am the only one to suffer this issue.

  4. #24

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    Do Archival Processing Later

    As opposed to having all those trays going at once, do a 30 minute wash when you print and archivally process keepers later on, including the second fix. A.A. discusses this in his book, The Print. In this way, you don't have to have all those trays going at once.

  5. #25
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    These are really great ideas for those of us with cramped darkroom spaces! Thanks for all the great ideas.

    As for gloves, I found a great source for nitrile gloves was in the gardening department of the local Home Depot. They sell a green plastic container of nitrile gloves called "Lawn & Garden Nitrile Gloves". They're lightly powdered so wash your hands after you put them on. They work great and are cheap, about $5 for 24 gloves.

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