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  1. #21

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    San Clemente, California
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    Quote Originally Posted by haris
    There are processors, and I belive that Jobo has some of them, but if I am wrong for Jobo, there are others, which have option for cooling down chemicals. If you can fin one cheap...
    I use a Jobo for film processing. Jobo instruction manuals explain how one can freeze water in one of the chemical bottles, then have the heater "work against" the ice to maintain one's selected temperature.

    It works OK to a point but, given the ambient temperatures Nicole's facing, she'd need a lot of frozen bottles and probably have to replace them (melted) in the middle of processing runs. The bottles expand when water within them turns to ice, making insertion into the processor openings difficult. My experience is that Jobos maintain selected temperature more precisely when ambient is lower rather than higher. Finally, tap water for washing is likely to be much hotter than the process temperature, risking reticulation at worst and increased grain at best.

    For all these reasons, I've decided to use higher-than-ambient processing temperatures with my Jobo throughout the year.

  2. #22

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    I don't now what the prices are down there for a window air conditioner, but here in FL USA they run as low as $89 for a small one which will usually take care of a small darkroom. This may not resolve your water temp problem, which is easier to overcome, but at least if you had a a/c unit you'd be more willing to spend time in the darkroom. Of course this depends on having a window or wall to the outside for heat exhaust.

  3. #23

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    Use the biggest igloo/ esky you can find for a water bath, filled 2/3 up to the top of your stainless tanks. More volume = more temp stability.
    Dip n dunk in the dark to keep your chems in the bath - works for C41 too (that's how we got buisness done at the Texan for anyone who knows Austin).

    For the wash:
    Run cold water supply line through a beer brewing chiller (i.e. coil of thin copper pipe) in a bucket of ice water (use frozen 2L bricks per Sorens suggestions). Beware the temp limits of your water filters and the cold surge every time you restart the flow. Output along w/ hot water supply into a good temp control mixer. Mount filters and controller on a waterproof board for portability. Replace filters regularly.

    Or bury a 25gal reservoir (to insulate it), hook up an RO unit and run a recirculating chiller off ebay.

  4. #24

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    I have the same problem.....raging summer right now....for developing.....i just stick chemicals in the fridge til they get to temp. then i do stauff at night too when its cooler!

  5. #25
    Nicole's Avatar
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    We're heading back to the hot summer again... Went from 22+C to 37+C overnight! I think summer has arrived. Note to self... need to insulate the darkroom!! Hope you're all enjoying your darkroom time.

  6. #26

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    Oct 2009
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    I live in Central Florida and the hot summer appears to be finally over. Now it's your turn... but please don't send it back when you are done... please...

  7. #27
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    Hi Nicole,
    Here on the west coast of Canada we had a particularly hot and dry summer with lots of fires (although not near as bad as the ones around Melbourne last summer), so I can't say I'm sorry to see the end of it. However, I'm not looking forward to dealing with the snow. Last winter had a very heavy snowfall and I spent at least half my time dealing with it.
    Have a good summer! No matter how hot it gets down there, at some point you can count on us northerners being jealous.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  8. #28
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Hi Nicole!!

    Long time, no see.

    I just got off the phone (well, leaving voicemail) with my heating/AC "guy" about putting some kind of unit in my soon to be new darkroom.* It is, of course, going from hot to cold here in the Northern hemisphere, but our summers can get blazing, as you've heard. Got to get this thing built and cooled by next Spring!

    * we moved - starting from scratch
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom

  9. #29

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    Why not just switch to color development? Your ambient temperature is already almost 38C which is required for E-6/C-41. You should have no trouble raising your solution temperatures a degree or so, and color chemicals don't mind being hot.

  10. #30
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    [ What are your best tips to keep your cool without airconditioning in your darkroom? (on a budget) My darkroom is a pretty good setup considering it's temporary until my big one gets finished out the back.
    *********
    Been there, done that.

    A towel around the head so one does not sweat on the paper. Lots of towels to keep the hands dry.

    Use a hardening stop bath for the film. Maybe a tropical film developer, also.

    ]
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

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