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  1. #1

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    AP reels in Paterson

    I have two paterson tanks, one is a 2 reel other a 3 reel. The 2 reel tank is ready to go with 2 paterson reels, that will get me going, but I want to be able to use both so when one is wet I can switch over to the other one, and I usually shoot over two rolls in a couple of days. Just wondering if the AP reels are as good as the paterson, or if I should just pay the extra and get paterson reels? Thanks

  2. #2

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    My experience is that the AP reels are just a little bit worse than the Paterson reels, but both types tend to jam on me, so I've switched to stainless steel.

  3. #3
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    I've got a "Universal" plastic reel that's a perfect fit in my Paterson Super System 4 tank. I can either develop two 120 rolls end to end, or two 35 mm one above the other (though in practice I usually do 35 mm in stainless -- easier to load, IMO, and uses a little less soup).
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  4. #4
    NikoSperi's Avatar
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    Worse? You've got to be kidding... I replaced all the Paterson reels with AP because they are THAT much better. The fat flange that keeps the 120 film flat and in to grooves is fab.
    I took a lighter to the Paterson reels and torched them in a ritualistic revenge for all the crimped 120 films they killed. Do yourself a favour and do the same.
    If you tone it down alot, it almost becomes bearable.

    - Walker Evans on using color

  5. #5
    Peter Black's Avatar
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    Hi Nicola

    Well I just tried to develop my first 35mm b&w film for quite a while last night, and jammed it good and solid on an AP reel. I then switched to a Paterson reel and jammed it good and solid on that one as well. If practice makes perfect, lack of practice just makes it plain useless.

    Searched here afterwards and found this thread which gives many opinions:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/showthrea...highlight=reel

  6. #6
    NikoSperi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Black
    Well I just tried to develop my first 35mm b&w film for quite a while last night, and jammed it good and solid on an AP reel. I then switched to a Paterson reel and jammed it good and solid on that one as well. If practice makes perfect, lack of practice just makes it plain useless.
    You want to make super sure they're bone dry. If it's raining outside can be enough to make them stick - take a hair dryer to them for a few minutes first. That applies to any plastic reels. You also want to clip off the corners of the film you're feeding in. I don't do it for 120, but if the 135 is clipped across a sprocket hole, it's very easy for it to jam. Good luck!
    If you tone it down alot, it almost becomes bearable.

    - Walker Evans on using color

  7. #7
    Peter Black's Avatar
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    It surprised me because I've hardly ever had problems with 35mm since I clip the film then start them off in the light until they are properly caught. It's no big deal as I was trying out a Nikon FE2 I bought secondhand recently, and I got to frame 27 before the film just kinked badly and I had to cut it. Wouldn't want it to happen for real though!

    I actually bought the AP reel some while back for 120 as I'm one of those who just seem to have problems with 120. No problem at all in a darkroom working on the open bench, but always a problem in a changing bag. I'll make sure they're clean and dry next time!

  8. #8

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    Neither AP nor Paterson will; give ANY trouble as long as you do two things:

    Do NOT immerse the reels and film in wetting agent. Remove the film from the reels first. Since doing this there is zero stickiness and both 35mm and 120 load almost by themselves. I also make sure evrything is bone dry and my hands are washed with soap and dried first to make them very dry and lacking in oils which can make the leading edge which you are trying to get past the ball bearing a bit tacky.

    Clip the corners of film (esp 120 to a 45 degree angle so is slips past the bearing and does not suffer any damaage which can casue snagging later on).

    APUG contributers gave me the tip about not letting reels near wetting agen when film is inside and WHAT A DIFFERENCE!!!!!!

    Tom

  9. #9
    edz
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    [QUOTE=Tom Stanworth
    APUG contributers gave me the tip about not letting reels near wetting agen when film is inside and WHAT A DIFFERENCE!!!!!![/QUOTE]

    Nothing wrong with wetting agents.. only that they must be well washed with warm water afterwards. The water should be hot as the reels will take but not to deform the reels in any possible way. Stainless steel reels can be boiled. Jobo, Paterson and AP reels should probably not be heated to beyond 50C or so. A good wash, brushing and some peroxide and lots of rinsing will keep reels clean and functioning. Many developers, btw. contain wetting agents. The problem with loading reels is often more gelatine rests than wetting agents. Just always rinse well after use and there should be no problem.

    P.S.: I find the AP reels to be a better design (they are also sold as Durst) than the Paterson but the latest Paterson reels to use slightly better plastics--- although not just up to Jobo. Between Jobo and Paterson for 120 I prefer the Paterson. Between AP/Durst and Paterson for 120 I prefer the AP.
    Edward C. Zimmermann
    BSn R&D // http://www.nonmonotonic.net

  10. #10
    Brac's Avatar
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    I go along with preferring the AP reels slightly to the Paterson and also the advice for 120 film to just clip the corners at the start of the film before attempting to load it. And as others have said the reels must be completely dry or trouble is guaranteed.

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