Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,933   Posts: 1,585,563   Online: 750
      
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Can
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    83
    Images
    3

    Ilford rapid fixer T Max ...

    Im going to try Ilford rapid fix, my last negs were purple as I messed up my mixing with the water too hot. I have powder developer and hypo clear. Just wondering a good fixing time for T Max films, somewhere between 5-10 mins ok . If it works out its just less powder for me to mix up. Thanks

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    San Francsico
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    34
    I use Ilford rapid fix for both my TMY and TMX 4x5 and 35mm negatives and fix for 4 minutes (using Ilford's 1+4 recommended dilution). I find that pre-soaking the negatives for 5 minutes goes a long way towards eliminating the dye residue. Fixing for longer periods just results in longer washing times and opening yourself up to potential fix residue problems, even when using a hypo clearing agent before the wash.

    Bob

  3. #3
    gnashings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,376
    Images
    17
    Hi Finny,

    I have used Ilford Rapidfix with Tmax films with no problems at all. I mix it as per instructions (1:9) and in the case of Kodak films, I leave them in for approx 8. This is a little longer than usual, but as you know, there is that purple cast which seems to be kept to a minimum that way. Also, I extend my washing times. Apparently (although I have not tried it myself) pre-soaking helps with the colour-cast as well. In the end, even though the colour is still there, the negatives seem to print ok.

    Good luck,

    Peter.

  4. #4
    jeroldharter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,958
    Images
    1
    I use Heico NH5 fixer diluted 1:4 with hardener for about 4 minutes for TMAX 100. It is a rapid fixer also. You should determine the clearing time for your film as a guide to your prsonal fixing time. I use a 5 minute presoak before developing and that removed alot of the color material from the negative and I have no problems with the magenta cast.
    Jerold Harter MD

  5. #5
    gnashings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,376
    Images
    17
    Ooops! I just realized the dilution is 1+4 not 1+9. I just had the paper dilution in my head... sorry about that, I think my head is not reall working well today!

  6. #6
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    I've used Ilford Rapid Fixer for T-Max 400 quite a lot -- at the film strength of 1+4 from concentrate, five minutes is plenty and four is probably okay. Do be aware that t-grain films (T-Max and Delta are the most common) will also use up fixer capacity more rapidly than conventional films, due to iodide buildup in the fixer. If you use primarily T-Max films, you should probably reduce Ilford's stated fixer capacity by at least 1/3, or rely on a clearing test (always with the same T-Max film) -- drop a leader into freshly mixed fixer, and time how long it takes to clear; fix for 3x that time, and test ever couple rolls; when the clearing time is twice what it was originally, it's time for new fixer.

    Lately, despite my tight budget, I've found it economical to one-shot (well, correctly, one-session) my film fixer. I've been using Polymax RT, which is a Kodak product intended for automated B&W paper processing; I dilute it to half the strength recommended, use it for one to four films in a single session, and discard it. The $20 jug of concentrate, which contained 5 L, is about 6 months old and about half gone (I use one ounce of concentrate to fix a roll of 35 mm; that means cost to one-shot my fixer is, at worst, about twelve cents). I'll keep using this as long as I can get it locally at a good price...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  7. #7
    jeroldharter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,958
    Images
    1
    [COLOR=Navy]I have found that a reasonably economical fixer is Ilford Hypam. I use it for print processing. I use the Heico NH-5 for film, mostly by habit. It is more expensive but I don't use as much.[/COLOR]
    Jerold Harter MD



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin