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  1. #1

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    DIY Vertical Print Washer

    For what it is worth I thought I would post my version of a DIY Vertical Print Washer. I have built two units, a 16x20 and a 11x14.

    The washers do not provided segregated compartments but provide maximum diffusion potential combined with a water inflow and outflow (in bottom out top or vice versa).

    The tanks are aquariums made of non-tempered glass so that I could drill the holes for the in and outflow piping. The dividers are made from a sheet of plastic lattice. The dividers are held in place by "wire management duct" that I cut in half and then siliconed to the end walls. Since the dividers actually float when the washer is full I had to add the small pipe that runs along the top at either end to keep them in place.

    The 16 x 20 uses a 24"L x 12D x 16H 20 gallon tank and the total cost of the washer was about $110 Cdn.

    The 11 x 14 uses a 20"L x 10D x 12H 10 gallon tank and the total cost of the washer was about $80 Cdn.

    Both washers use washing machine hoses for the in and out flow hoses.

    Todd
    Depending on the in flow rate the washer can anywhere from 1/2 to 4 1/2 changes per hour.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCN1908.jpg   DSCN1904.jpg   DSCN1906.jpg   DSCN1905.jpg   DSCN1912.jpg  


  2. #2
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Barlow
    For what it is worth I thought I would post my version of a DIY Vertical Print Washer. I have built two units, a 16x20 and a 11x14.
    Todd,

    Very impressive!

    Don Bryant

  3. #3

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    very nice work.

  4. #4

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    Totally Nifty!
    "Never assume that children will remain where you last saw them." --From the Lawn*Boy Operator's Manual

  5. #5
    Max Power's Avatar
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    Todd,
    Sincere thanks for posting this...I have been mulling over some ideas for a home-made print washer for a few weeks now, and you have given me some fresh ideas.

    Cheers mate!

    Kent
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

  6. #6

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    Hi Todd,

    those are interesting dividers. I wish I found material alike for my washer.

    I ended up using plexi screens, kept in position by fiberglass dividers:


  7. #7

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    What is the plastic lattice originally designed for? I like it a lot, but I don't think I've seen it for sale. Is it a gardening item?

    How do you drill holes in glass?

  8. #8

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    The plastic lattice is a substitute for the pressure treated or cedar varieties as it is low / no maintenance. It gets used for all the regular uses such as privacy fencing, the top foot or so of a regular fence and I have seen it used as a trellis as well.

    To cut the holes I bought a ceramic tile / glass 1/2" OD drill bit. It was a kit that came with a drilling template. Once the template was mounted with some clamps I set the tank over the sink and directed a water hose over the area being cut and started to drill with my cordless drill and it took about 2-3 minutes to cut through (make sure you ease up as you get close to breaking through).

  9. #9

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    Nice work and some great ideas Todd. Thanks for posting.

    --John

  10. #10

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    Good job! I imagine that the lattice would act to eliminate or at least minimize the tendency of one side of washing prints to stick to one of the sides. As far as cross-contamination, Versalab used to have a technical piece on how it's just not an issue if prints are pre-rinsed before they go into the washer. I have looked but don't see it on their website anymore. I have an old, but I think second generation design, East Street washer that uses for print separators wire bent into inverted u-shapes with the legs stuck into little holes in the bottom of the washer. (I once had a first generation design East Street washer. It was the only washer I've ever had with solid plexi dividers where the prints didn't cling to one or the other side, this because the bottom was drilled with dozens of tiny holes drilled diagonally in alternate directions.Each print hovered nicely in the middle of its slot. I wish I still had it.)

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