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  1. #11
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    Why not use a Kodak Tray siphon in a 16 x 20 or 20 x 24 tray and a low flow of cold tap water? Unless you are tropical, your cold water temperature should be below 68 degrees.
    Jerold Harter MD

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter
    Why not use a Kodak Tray siphon in a 16 x 20 or 20 x 24 tray and a low flow of cold tap water? Unless you are tropical, your cold water temperature should be below 68 degrees.

    Try summer temps of 90 on the cold side here. DFW Texas is above 80 on their cold supply from what I have been told.

  3. #13

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    I have been thinking about this since I will be dealing with the high temps of the domestic water supply this summer.

    I am thinking that an insulated ice chest used to house a supply of ice...maybe even a brine/ice solution with 1/4 inch type K copper coiled at the bottom and brought through the wall of the chest with 1/4 inch bulk head connectors would provide the source of cooling. External of the chest, the tubing would be extended into the tempering bath with a corresponding copper tubing coil in the bottom of the tempering bath. The tempering bath solution would be circulated with a small acqaurium pump amd I would think that this would probably do the job. To control the pump a Thermodisc snap action thermostat clamped on the circulated loop would switch the pump in and out as required.

    No cooling effect would occur until and if the pump were running.

  4. #14

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    I mounted a $89 6000 Btu a/c unit in my bath window and it keeps the whole room, and me, around 68 deg if I want it to. Back when I use to develop in tanks with holders I never had a temp problem once I cooled the solutions in the fridge.

  5. #15

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    I think the iceprobe and controller are the ticket for me. Other methods mentioned here will all have some degree of hassle and maintenance for my situation, and the iceprobe (if it works) will be almost hassle -free like my heater is. Hopefully it will chill water in not too much more time than my aquarium heater takes to heat it. My darkroom window is smaller than any a/c unit I've ever seen, or i would consider that, but my darkroom is also HUGE so even if I could get one to fit it would cost a lot to cool-and I'd have to figure out a new exhaust system too.
    Nope, I think the iceprobe is my best bet.

    Wayne

  6. #16

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    For negative development I use a chilled water bath for developer, stop, fix and clearing, for wash I use a large plastic bucket filled with ice and water with coiled copper tubing running though the bucket from the faucet to the negative washer, wash water is over 90 and is cooled to 70 degrees. A one 8 pound bag of ice lasts for 10 to 15 mints.

    For prints I keep a few cubes of Ice in zip lock bags which I float in the trays, I can keep the trays at 75 degrees without too much trouble.

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