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  1. #11

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    Okay I'll offer a different solution. I made the frames of my drying screen out of 1/2inch PVC water pipe and 90 degree elbows. I assembled the frames with PVC glue and then used the same glue to attach nylon window screen. The frames are stored on wire stretched between the legs of a table in the darkroom. I take them outside a couple of times a year and wash them without worrying whether the frames will warp.
    Ron
    Memphis

  2. #12
    djkloss's Avatar
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    I made mine out of wooden screen window frames and staple the screen to them. (using nylon screening - not the metal kind -) I put hinges on them and mounted them on the wall so they'd be horizontal and put an s-hook on the end of a cord hanging from the ceiling which holds them up when in use, and they lay down vertically when not in use.

  3. #13

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    Jan 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monophoto
    I built a set - really quite simple. Bought some 1x2" clear pine, and sawed it in half to make two pieces of 1x1" (actually 3/4" by 3/4"). Used those to make a rectangular frame. I used a butt joint reinforced with a metal plate (from the hardware store) on the bottom, but if you are persnickety you could use a lap joint. Sanded lightly, and then applied several coats of polyurethane varnish. Finally, used a staple gun to attach fiberglass screening to the frame, and put some rubber "feet" on the bottom. The individual screen frames were sized to allow four 11x14" prints to be layed out on the screen without actually lying over the wooden frame (ie, the inside dimensions of the frame were 22" by 18" or greater).

    Then, I made a rack that fits under my sink. I bought some pine "outside corner guard" moulding that I attached to the legs of the sink to form tracks that the screens slide into. Here's a picture of what the final setup looks like.
    Mine is similar to this, too. I used 1x1"s (spruce) for the frames/screens, and 1x4"s for the rack. Each screen is big enough to put a 16x20" sized print (or two 11x14"s), and I have six of them in total. I could make more if I needed.

    To make this you don't need any exceptionally high carpentry skills (I don't have any), but you just come up with a design and a few tools such as a hand saw, a screw-gun, and a sanding device.

    Also I have one huge left-over aluminum window-frame that I got from a local window-frame shop for free. Maybe you can check the store(s) near you and see if they have something to throw away first.

  4. #14

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    Jan 2005
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    Yorkville, Il
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    This is what I use,http://www.containerstore.com/browse...10&itemIndex=1 they stack up nicely and can be put together in nothing flat.

    Mike

  5. #15
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Nov 2002
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    I once saw some really interesting plans for a drying "rack" in Camera and Darkroom.

    It was constructed of a common "window shade" roller mechanism, with the standard shade cut and nylon window screening substituted in its place, with a stretcher bar and hook. The shade was mounted to work horizontally over the bench. In use, simply draw the shade out and hook it to the opposite wall - or whatever. When the prints are dry, simply unhook it and retract the screening out of the way.

    You know .... I've gotta try that!!
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  6. #16

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    Dec 2004
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    Phoeinx Arizona
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    that is really nifty idea and is it cheap, cheaper than the canvas strecher and fiberglass screen that I used. Do they stack on top of the other?

  7. #17

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    Nov 2005
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    Burley, New Forest
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    I've never come across window screens here in the UK, so I'm wondering what I could use instead. From the descriptions above it sounds like a flexible material with a fine mesh. Is it as thin and flexible as net curtain material?

    Kevin

  8. #18

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    Jan 2005
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    Japan
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdanks
    I've never come across window screens here in the UK, so I'm wondering what I could use instead. From the descriptions above it sounds like a flexible material with a fine mesh. Is it as thin and flexible as net curtain material?

    Kevin
    The window screen material I use is fiber-glass, not nylon for sure, and it's very cheap and widely available here in Japan.

  9. #19
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Apr 2004
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    Hi There

    I went to a window glass company and had them make me screens to the sizes I want, I would suggest if you want to hang 16 x20 prints I would make the inside of the screen 20 x 40.This will allow you to put 2 16x20s at once on each screen . I use a bottom and top with the emulsion up for drying. Make as many as you need.

    Go to a building supply store, that has the closet shelving units. they are approximately 30inches x up to 8 ft long, they make smaller sizes as well. With a hack saw you can custom fit them into odd spaces.
    You can then attach them to a free wall starting at the bottom and building up every 16inches or so. they have arms for support along the length of the shelving, the shelving is thick wire covered with plastic , it is lightweight and easy to install. Depending upon your space you could store as many prints as you like. My set up can handle up to 40-50 16x20s at a time.
    Two prints are squeeged up at a time on the rack and it is then placed on the shelving units. By spacing the screen sandwiches out you can easily dry over night as many prints as your wall or space can handle.

    I found that making a stacking drying system *one set of prints directly over another set of prints* did not give the prints room to breathe. One it did not dry the prints properly and sometimes if the humidity was high an extremely long time to get prints ready for finishing with some of the prints showing ugly water marks and excessive waviness.

  10. #20
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    I have a runners with window screens made to size fit under one of my benches, much like other have mentioned, but I also have screens just a little smaller that fit inside the screens, that sit on top of the print as it dries, and they come out pretty flat.

    After I totally flatten them in my dry mount press, they seem to stay that way better than before I did it this way.

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