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  1. #11
    wildbill's Avatar
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    off topic: Enlarger alignment laser tools seem a little overkill to me. Take a sheet of glass and put a mark on it near each corner of the projected area. Adjust your enlarger until all four corners are in focus. I did this with my d-2 and haven't had to re-align since.
    btw Ralph's book "Way Beyond Monochrome" is an excellent resource with plenty of useful darkroom tips.

    vinny
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill
    off topic: Enlarger alignment laser tools seem a little overkill to me. vinny
    I find a laser alignment tool very useful. It allows aligment in all directions, both at the negative and at the lens, in moments.
    If you make adjustments for correcting verticals, or even just changing heads, getting all planes aligned can be tedious and time consuming.
    Maybe some can do it quickly and accurately, but I used all the other techniques for a long time before getting one of these and found them frustrating and often inaccurate.
    Tim

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim4848
    procedure for making boderless prints. Jim Olson
    Decades ago, when bled off prints were the norm and RC rarely used, I used 'sticky easels'. These were low tack boards which help paper pretty flat with no border arms.
    Might look for them 2nd hand ?

  4. #14
    FrankB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill
    off topic:
    Fair point. Sorry!

    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill
    Enlarger alignment laser tools seem a little overkill to me. Take a sheet of glass and put a mark on it near each corner of the projected area. Adjust your enlarger until all four corners are in focus. I did this with my d-2 and haven't had to re-align since.
    btw Ralph's book "Way Beyond Monochrome" is an excellent resource with plenty of useful darkroom tips.

    vinny
    Actually, I'm aware of how to align an enlarger (although thanks for posting it anyway!), I was just curious about how important/relevant Ralph thought it was given his earlier comment re easel DoF.

    You're perfectly correct, though; this thread is not the place to do it. Apologies for the hijack!
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim rudman
    I used 'sticky easels'.
    I worked at a process camera equipped with a
    'sticky back'. My first post this thread mentions
    the 3M product. I'd think a good DIY project.
    Likely Valley Litho carries it. Perhaps the
    local printers supply store. Dan

  6. #16

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    If the paper curls, I've found that rolling it into a tube opposite the direction of curl for a few seconds does a good (but not perfect) job of cancelling the curl, at least long enough to expose a print. I'd call this the "quick-and-dirty" solution, though; double-sided tape or a vacuum easel would probably do a better job.

  7. #17
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrankB
    Ralph,

    I've seen a lot of threads on here (and elsewhere) regarding easel/enlarger alignment, with some recommending using laser tools to align at the start of each print session. If the depth of field around the easel is as large as you say, what would be your view of this issue?

    All the best,

    Frank

    Well, the depth-of-field at the base-board is relatively large. I can post the equation if required. Having said that, a few degrees of misalignment can cause a significant shift in the DoF. Also of course, it is best to be in the middle of the DoF for optimum sharpness. I made a laser alignment tool for less than $35 (the plan is in my book). I use it after using Scheimpflug-adjustments to bring everything back into parallel.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #18
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    This works well. One of my tutors used double-sided tape and made it less sticky with some dust around the darkroom, before using it for the first time. Every few weeks the tape was replaced. It works well and keeps the paper well within DoF.

    His name is Monte Nagler and you might have seen his prints as IKEA posters.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill
    Enlarger alignment laser tools seem a little overkill to me. vinny
    Yes, off topic so ONE matter to consider. Stamped metal
    components should not to be confused with machined flats.
    I involve only two planes when making an alignment; the
    plane of the negative carrier and it's projected plane.
    I think Vinny's and my method are very similar. I do
    check for square as I'm not sure sharp at four
    corners is necessarily square.

    Vinny's or my method, the results of an alignment
    are confirmed on the baseboard or easel. Dan

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