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  1. #1

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    borderless prints

    I am fairly new to b&w print making and would like to know the correct
    procedure for making boderless prints. I currently use a couple of rapid easels that make 8x10 and 5 x7 prints with a border. I have tried a cheap
    boderless easel and found it difficult to use as the paper didnt always
    lay flat. Is the correct procedure when making a 5x7 using the more expensive easels that are adjustable to use an 8x10 sheet of paper and then trim to 5x7 after. Thanks

    Jim Olson

  2. #2
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    All my prints are borderless, because I almost always print the entire negative and trim the borders after the prints are dry. I called it 'cutting off the chemical edge'. An untrimmed print contains unwanted processing chemicals that penetrated into the edges. Get rid of them.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #3
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    This is something I have been thinking about too. My paper usually bows in the middle putting the focus off.

    As I have the use of a CNC drill/router (the type for PCB manufacture rather than machine shop), I have been thinking about making a vacuum bed. I need to find a small vacuum pump that isn't too noisy though.

    Other options are some low tack double sided tape to hold the paper down. Ordinary double sided tape can have it's tackiness reduced with a bit of french chalk or talcum powder.

    EDIT: I was writing this as Ralph was writing his reply. That is a very good point about edge penetration of chemicals and something I had not thought about before.

    Steve.

  4. #4
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    On that point - How much of the edge should be trimmed? I'm certainly no expert, but it seems to me that, if there are any chemicals left in the paper after the wash, then it wasn't washed long enough. Opinions everyone?

    Bruce


    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht
    All my prints are borderless, because I almost always print the entire negative and trim the borders after the prints are dry. I called it 'cutting off the chemical edge'. An untrimmed print contains unwanted processing chemicals that penetrated into the edges. Get rid of them.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceN
    On that point - How much of the edge should be trimmed? I'm certainly no expert, but it seems to me that, if there are any chemicals left in the paper after the wash, then it wasn't washed long enough. Opinions everyone?

    Bruce
    That was my immediate thought too. I never trim borders off myself, in fact I like wide borders (very min.half an inch)..

    Also, I suppose it depends what you want to do with your print - quite difficult to matt mount a print without borders...Also, difficult to handle, without damaging the print itself, unless you use archival sleeves...

  6. #6
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    With RC-papers, edge penetration is almost impossible to wash out. FB-papers dont have the problem. I trim both (I dry-mount) and hope (don't have the test facilities to test for chemical residue from edge penetration) that a 1/4 minimum is enough.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #7
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    I dry-mount and consequently don't want borders on prints. However, I agree with the want for wide borders, which I satisfy with the size of the overmat.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #8
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    The depth-of-field arond the easel is suprisingly large (several mm). How much is your 'bow'? You can test for it by focusing on the paper and then 'supporting' it with increasing layers of mountboard. The paper doesn't need to be absolutely flat, and there is really no need to support the grain focuser with a layer of paper, as some do.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #9

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    [QUOTES=Steve Smith]
    "My paper usually bows in the middle putting the focus off.
    ...low tack double sided tape..."

    I've a couple of borderless easels. Maybe they are for RC.
    Worthless with my FB. I like flat as in FLAT. Consider: A, a
    wet FB is FLAT; B, 3M sells a sticky back spray. I'm going to
    give the wetted and sponge dried method a try. I think one
    of those two easels may do for positioning. Dan

  10. #10
    FrankB's Avatar
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    Ralph,

    I've seen a lot of threads on here (and elsewhere) regarding easel/enlarger alignment, with some recommending using laser tools to align at the start of each print session. If the depth of field around the easel is as large as you say, what would be your view of this issue?

    All the best,

    Frank
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

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