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  1. #11
    sun of sand's Avatar
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    That's what I figured
    They seem like a huge mess without much real benefit
    but hey

    maybe one day something changes

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    This is off the topic of the Nikor sheet film tank, but once you learn to load stainless steel reels, most people find them faster to load and easier to clean thoroughly than plastic, and you can reload them before they're completely dry, unlike Paterson reels. There is also lots of processing equipment out there for handling standard stainless steel reels--tanks of all sizes, cages for deep tanks, etc. I don't think I've ever heard of a professional lab using Paterson reels.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  3. #13
    Chaska's Avatar
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    Funny to see this thread pop back up. I have been using the tank for 2 years thanks to David's instructions and love it. I shoot bag mags in 3x4 and 4x5 and it is great to be able to develop everything at once. Actually my tank doesn't leak, it's just a bear to get the top off to change chems. I have found it easier to use devs with longer times because it takes a while to fill.

  4. #14

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    Absolutely, SS reels and tanks are the "way to go". It can take some practice to get quick and accurate at loading SS reels, but once you learn, you don't forget, it's just like learning to ride a bicycle. You'll wonder why you ever used plastic reels.

  5. #15
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I've acquired a second Nikor sheet film tank and have discovered that there are two types. The reel seems to be the same in both tanks, but the newer one has a slightly taller tank, and the fill cap is a bit larger. The older one has a shinier finish, and the top is a bit more difficult to remove. I'm missing the metal band on the more recently acquired older tank, but I've been using a rubber band without difficulty.

    I usually leave one set up for 4x5" and one for 2x3", and then if I have a lot of film to process, I can set them both to the same size.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #16
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    David you may have gotten a tank for the 220 large reels double size. I have a couple of these that I use when doing my C41 4x5 and it makes processing much less of a hassle to fill the tanks and simply switch the reels from tank to tank in the dark.
    Gary Beasley

  7. #17
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It's possible, but the older tank seems to be of the same vintage as the reel. Maybe they used the same tank at some point. The reel also fits in a 5x7" 5 quart tank, so sometimes I use the reel in my tank line, depending on what developer I want to use, or I'll develop and rinse in the daylight tank, turn off the lights, and fix in the deep tank.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #18

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    I am new to APUG, but I too have on of these tanks that I got on Ebay. As noted above, the critical thing is to get the reel spacing correct and then the tank works well. Mine does not leak either, but it is slow to fill and empty so, also as mentioned, use developers that require long times, ie not very active ones or high dilution of active ones like rodinal. As an aside and a bit of history, these tanks have been made since about 1938 give or take. I have seen ads for them in old 1938/1939 photography magazines from that era that our library has in bound format. I also have a Fink & Roselieve adjustable cut film developing tank that my father used to use for 2-1/4 by 3-1/4 cut film. It works well too, although you cannot invert it for agitation like the Nikor tank, but i have to say, it is easier to laod than the Nikor, besides it has a kind of nostalgic feel about. But then so does useing film in general these days.

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