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  1. #21
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    You'd probably be fine with glossy paint ( really )

    Fiberglass, epoxy, and Marine plywood is beyond overkill.

    Any restaurants near you going out of businesss ?
    Steel sinks are handy.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  2. #22
    david b's Avatar
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    I spoke to the Line-X folks this morning and was told that no prep is needed in applying their product. Just bring them the sink, completed, and then they spray it.

    As for price, that said it would be about $300 and it's ready to use in 24 hours.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    You'd probably be fine with glossy paint ... Fiberglass,
    epoxy, and Marine plywood is beyond overkill.
    Many years ago I put sink and 4x5 tanks together.
    They were coated with some sort of water-proof
    rubberized paint. Today I'd consider going the
    same rout.

    I'm a counter type. Plenty of counter with sink only
    large enough to wash up. But then again I don't slop
    chemistry all over the place. Dan

  4. #24
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    Well, this got me all fired up and I built a sink this weekend. It is only about 3' square for a wash sink. I went to two national stores yesterday looking for some sort of waterproof paint and the best they could offer was oil enamel. Maybe that would work, but I want something more bullet proof. I haven't tried marine stores yet.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  5. #25
    Curt's Avatar
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    Many years ago I put sink and 4x5 tanks together.
    They were coated with some sort of water-proof
    rubberized paint. Today I'd consider going the
    same rout.

    I'm a counter type. Plenty of counter with sink only
    large enough to wash up. But then again I don't slop
    chemistry all over the place. Dan
    That reminds me of the first time I stepped foot into the darkroom at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena California. There were large square tables with people developing paper in trays on the table. It was really strange coming from a University where Darkroom sinks were where we put the trays. If you aren't messy and the room is the proper temperature I don't see a problem with less sink and more counter. you can do a lot more with counter space than in a sink.

    I migrated to Brooks Institute and found the sink and tray line again. It's all up to the individual. I have a factory made 6' sink and two lab hard rubber over steel deep chemical sinks.

  6. #26
    Troy Hamon's Avatar
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    I went for wet counters. Half sink, half counter. The counters are sloped and drain into the sink, which is just a regular laundry tub. I thought about making a true sink, but I was working in a half bath with no sink space, just a portable table I would set up for trays, and didn't entirely see a need for a huge sink as long as I had a surface that could handle getting wet and could be cleaned easily. Photos here.

  7. #27

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    I figured out how to get a 10 foot sink out of a 8 foot board.

    I had also desired a 10 foot sink, but the cost of a 10 foot piece of plywood was alarming. Since I had decided to create a 32"x10' sink, I got a regular 4x8x3/4, cut two 32" sections off the length (size 32"x48") cut a 24"x32" out of the piece that was left and two 8"x29" from the remains. Putting the 32x48's on the ends, the 24x32 in the middle, with the 8x29 overlapping the joints. Lots of exterior glue and screws. The sink sits on a 2x4 frame. I use 2x6 sides on the sink (I had read somewhere that you should provide a wide board so you could lean on it when you were tired) this works well. Placed coving on the inside joints to give a rounded corner effect. Covered the sink with several coats of epoxy paint (marine epoxy from a boat supplier). I have been using this sink for the last 1 1/2 years, I don't think its possible for it to leak. Its great to be able to place 16x20 trays, (20x24 will fit) without worrying about spilling (considering I'd previously used the kitchen sink and counters).

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt
    ... less sink and more counter. You can do a lot
    more with counter space than in a sink.
    My sentiments entirely. I wonder at the fascination
    with long, wide, deep sinks. Bent over reaching down,
    who needs it? Then, as you imply, they take up so
    much room, room which is useless as such for
    other purposes.

    I think the fascination may have to do with overly
    full trays coupled with an awkward, sloppy, way of
    agitation. The person processing can see no way out
    but to have one of those over grown sinks. Dan

  9. #29

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    I've worked on counters for 40 years. If a person has the room, resources and desires a sink, why not have one? It's nice to be able to mix chemicals and have no worries of spills.

  10. #30
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I think a very shallow, counter-like sink, at counter height, is the best of both worlds - easy and flexible and comfortable for working, but also easy to keep clean.

    Matt

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