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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Durham, NC
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    I built my darkroom sinks out of 3/4 ply and then had them coated in fiberglass. I then painted them with the best exterior oil paint I could find.... Average paper developers are caustic enough to remove exterior paint after about a month of daily use. I strongly recommend that you use a marine epoxy paint. Even that will require a new application after 4-5 years. This is not overkill. You would be wasting your time and money using an exterior house paint.

    Regards,
    Don Sigl
    www.drs-fineartphoto.com

  2. #32

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    Sep 2005
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    Lancaster, Pennsylvania
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    Sink Coating

    I coated the inside of my plywood sink, which I built a year ago, with Gluvit, a two-part marine epoxy. Then several coats of marine paint (Brightside Polyurethane). Though I wasn't going for beauty, I've got to say that that paint is a beautiful thing to behold—it gives an ultra-smooth, high gloss finish. Both the paint and epoxy came from a local boat store.

    --Ben

  3. #33
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    Feb 2003
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    Santa Barbara, CA
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    Ben

    I just painted mine with one part polyurethane epoxy. I guess air is the second part. How long does it take the smell to go away? It's been since Sunday and I'm sure if it were in the darkroom, I'd be overwhelmed by outgassing.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  4. #34

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    Sep 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loose Gravel
    Ben

    I just painted mine with one part polyurethane epoxy. I guess air is the second part. How long does it take the smell to go away? It's been since Sunday and I'm sure if it were in the darkroom, I'd be overwhelmed by outgassing.
    To be honest, I don't recall. Actually, I don't remember outgassing as a problem. I applied the epoxy outdoors and let it dry there. After it cured I moved the sink into the garage; whatever smell there was was gone by then. Perhaps it was a few days? What I do remember is that the epoxy instructions called for washing the dried surface before painting. I did give it a wash, but I wasn't particularly thorough—I couldn't understand why it was necessary. Experience and a little research after the fact explained why. Some epoxies develop amine blush after they cure. That is a waxy coating to which paint will not stick. My half-hearted washing did remove most of the coating. But there were a few spots I missed. Paint just runs right off.

    --Ben

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