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  1. #21
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieHipsterDie
    I found the problem. It is the (drum roll please) SAFELIGHT!!!

    In total darkness I exposed and developed a sheet of the Ilford and it looked great. No grey borders and nice highlights.

    Now how do I fix this? I'm using an amber light. Do I need to go with red?

    Thanks for all your answers.
    READ THE SAFE LIGHT INSTRUCTIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS THAT COMES WITH EACH BOX OF PAPER.

  2. #22
    DieHipsterDie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce (Camclicker)
    READ THE SAFE LIGHT INSTRUCTIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS THAT COMES WITH EACH BOX OF PAPER.
    It says light brown. Which is what I have.

    I fixed things though by moving the light further away from the paper and by improving the overall darkness of the room.

    Problem solved and I'm lovin' it!

  3. #23
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieHipsterDie
    It says light brown. Which is what I have.

    I fixed things though by moving the light further away from the paper and by improving the overall darkness of the room.

    Problem solved and I'm lovin' it!
    Amber will be fine - as you have found, you need to move it some distance away though. A red safelight filter would allow more light - but I hate red light - depressing colour! Safelights with plastic or glass filters covering a lamp are not terribly efficient and some light of other wavelengths escapes through the filter and can fog the paper as you have found, so you need to keep it relatively dim.

    You should try to eliminate all white light from the darkroom. It's true that often a tiny sliver of light coming under the door for example will not cause a problem, but it is all accumulative and add that to the safelight leakage plus the light leaking around the enlarger head plus the after-glow from a fluorescent light plus the fact that it took you longer than usual to print a sheet so it is out of the box for 3 times longer than usual, etc, etc... it's worth killing all sources of external light.

    It really would be worth trying to find a book or two in your local library on darkroom work - much more convenient that reading on a PC screen. However, there are a number of useful documents on the Ilford and Kodak web sites that show how to do things like testing your safelighting (although you seem to have sorted it, it is entirely possible that a slight veiling of the highlights is still taking place - a proper test will ensure this does not happen).

    In any event, have fun!

    Cheers, Bob.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by DieHipsterDie
    Illford Multigrad paper, Detktol developer. Our prints are nothing but varying shades of grey. No amount of exposure seems to help. I've tried filters from 1 to 9 and the problem remains. Using the same setup I tried a print on some old Seagul and it rendered a beautiful image full of wonderful blacks, whites and greys.

    Is it possible the paper is bad? What's going on here?
    Glad you've found the fault. However if it's the safelight, anyone care to advance a reason as to why Seagull was OK?

    Thanks

    pentaxuser

  5. #25
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser
    Glad you've found the fault. However if it's the safelight, anyone care to advance a reason as to why Seagull was OK?

    Thanks

    pentaxuser
    Different papers have different sensitivity to safelight colours - especially if the Seagull was graded paper as they tend to roll off their sensitivity earlier than variable contrast papers. I do not have a curve for Seagull (and in any case we do not know which version it was) but compare Ilford's curves for Galerie and MGIV and you will see that Galerie has little response above 500nm whereas MGIV does not reach that level of insensitivity until about 570 - 580nm. Result is that an amber (590nm) LED safelight could be very bright indeed when using Galerie, but needs to be much dimmer with MGIV as it still has some sensitivity at 590nm (albeit very small).

    Cheers, Bob.

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