Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,717   Posts: 1,514,827   Online: 863
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: Sticky reels

  1. #11
    Shmoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    972
    Images
    11
    with plastic reels, it helps if you nick a tiny bit off of the corners of the film before loading it. It keeps it from buckling on the front end. Also, using photo flo can gum up the works and make it difficult to load a plastic reel.

    S
    Save the Earth. It's the only planet with chocolate.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cardiff, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    736
    Images
    68
    Do you need to buy a s/steel film loader as well? Is this the only way you can get your film onto the reel? I've looked at Hewes website and it doesn't appear like they have traditional drums, just a huge rectangular 2.5 litre tank. :-S

  3. #13
    Dave Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Middle England
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,894
    Images
    2
    Since I'm a plastic reel man I cannot give you deinitive advice on S/steel, but I have seen single and double reel tanks on eBay. Make sure that you get the reel size that you need since they do not adjust between 35, or 120 as the Paterson do, and it would be easy to end up with the wrong size.
    There have been many discussions regarding plastic v s/steel in this forum, and the two camps have consistantly failed to agree on the best method. It may pay you to do a search of the previous threads for more information before you defect.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    S/s reels are interchangeable in all s/s tanks I have encountered, though some good-quality spirals are a tight fit in some cheap Japanese tanks. Kindermann tanks are the best I have used.

    Plastic spirals are not interchangeable between Paterson and Jobo (the two leaders) because the designs are quite different.

    I believe that Hewes is now making s/s reels that fit into plastic tanks but am not sure.

    No, you don't need an s/s reel loader.

    I use both plastic (Jobo) and s/s. The Jobos are great for the CPE-2; the s/s are better for developing a roll or two as they use less dev than a Jobo tank when it's not on the CPE-2.

    Cheers,

    R. (www.rogerandfrances.com)

  5. #15
    Philippe-Georges's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Flanders Fields
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    722
    Jervman,

    I had the seem problem too, with the Jobo reels.
    Then I had a clouse look, and I dicovered that it was the dried-on last bath, Agepon or Sistan and the like, who coused the problem.
    It looks like the soapy matter, when dry, makes the film to stick.
    So, from then on I thoroughly wash (soake) the reels in warm water each time I used them.
    The problem is out of the way now.
    I hope is works for you as well.

    Good luck,

    Philippe
    "...If you can not stand the rustle of the leafs, then do not go in to the woods..."
    (freely translated quote by Guido Gezelle)

    PS: English is only my third language, please do forgive me my sloppy grammar...

  6. #16

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,725
    Quote Originally Posted by Jarvman
    Would stainless steel reels make a big difference? I'll check out the names you suggested.
    Stainless steel reels load in a completely different way from most plastic reels. Rather than insert the film tip in an outer edge of the spiral and work it inward, as you do with most platic reels, you flex the film and attach it to the center of the reel and then rotate the reel, letting the film settle within the spiral. This very different method of loading the reel means that it's almost completely immune from sticking problems. (I say "almost" as a hedge -- I can imagine a reel that's literally covered in goo causing problems, but I find it hard to believe that anything even remotely clean would be difficult to load because of stickiness.) OTOH, you'll have to re-learn how to load your film if you switch from one to another, and stainless steel reels have their own problems. The worst of these is probably the possibility of their being bent out of shape if they're dropped. Even a small distortion can make it difficult to load a reel. You can also encounter problems if you don't center the film correctly when starting the operation. Hewes reels are recommended because they're made of thicker steel that's less likely to get bent and because (for 35mm) they use tabs that engage with the first sprocket holes on the film, which makes for better and easier centering of the film.

    Oddly, Hewes reels are often sold under other brand names, at least in the US. They do make reels that are supposed to fit over spindles for use in plastic tanks; Freestyle sells them for 35mm and for medium format. These cost $29.95 and $36.99, respectively. This compares to stainless steel Hewes reels for stainless steel tanks that cost $13.99 for 35mm or $16.99 for medium format. Freestyle sells their house-brand tank without reels for $14.99, so the cost of a tank plus reels is similar to the cost for reels to fit a plastic tank.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,638
    Images
    5
    And remember that SS tanks (Roger is right--Kinderman is best, and tanks with plastic tops don't leak) go for almost nothing on E-Bay. I also recently picked up a couple of apparently-unused King Concept (Hewes) 35mm reels in the box for just over $10.00.

    Konical

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    New Brunswick , Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    86
    If your darkroom is in a damp location,such as a basement,even the moisture in the air can cause the reels to stick. I had this problem,and cured it by using a hair dryer on them just before loading the film.

    Rob.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cardiff, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    736
    Images
    68
    There's a Kindermann tank and reels ending on eBay tomorrow. I should be able to pick them up for about £10 or so. I'll be able to give them a try for a minimal price then. If i don't get along with them I'll heed the advice about soaking plastic reels in warm water for longer. I normally give them a quite a quick rinse, so perhaps there's still dried up wetting agent on them.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,725
    Be aware that used SS reels may be bent. This can make it very difficult to load them. I don't know how prone Kinderman reels are to bending, though, and I have no knowledge of the particular eBay auction you mention.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin