Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,898   Posts: 1,521,065   Online: 983
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30
  1. #21
    butterflydream's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Korea
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    192
    Images
    31
    Another advantage of steel reel is you can load film when it's still wet. When I have to develop many films after return from trip it's good as I have only a few tanks and reels. Also I can check the film base after fixer and put the film back into reel easily.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    306
    Images
    26
    Throw out the plastic tanks and reels. Many people find them perfectly acceptable. I find them to be useless. Once you learn to load a stainless steel reel, you'll wonder why you wasted all theat time and effort on plastic.

    They last forever. Use stainless.
    Don Sigl
    www.drs-fineartphoto.com

  3. #23
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    No, NO!!! Do not ... uh ... contaminate your local landfill! Let me know and I'll PM my address ... and you can ship them to me.

    One distinct advantage to plastic - the reels are remarkably resilient - they are either straight - or broken. I've dropped SS reels before - and spent FAR more time straightening them than I have with plastic (incidentally, I have never broken a plastic reel, either).

    Are we all so "hyper" here that we cannot spend a few minutes to let a reel dry? - or are we all so cheap (and I claim first prize in that area) that we can only have one reel? I usually cycle two reels; in the time it takes to load the second reel, the first one is dry.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    306
    Images
    26
    Ok.... For preservation of the environment.... all unwanted plastic tanks and reels should be shipped to Ed.

    Thanks Ed I'd send you mine, but....well I had one when I was a freshman many years ago, and.....it didn't survive. (May have been the frisbee fling against the darkroom wall that did it in). I still have all the steel reels from those days though.
    Don Sigl
    www.drs-fineartphoto.com

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,993
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach View Post
    ??? I'm convincing myself that there is something going on here I cannot visualize.
    I was afraid to ask...

    Last time I "broke" a roll of film was when I mis-loaded a 35mm camera and the perforations ripped because I got too agressive and used a lot of pressure on the winging lever (yup, I was upset and out of control because I ran out of film and the light was fading quickly). After opening the camera back (in daylight) I tried ripping the film, but ended up basically biting it apart... and then biting a new leader. My mouth tasted funny, but it worked and I got the shot I wanted.

  6. #26
    jstraw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Topeka, Kansas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,703
    Images
    42
    I worked for a time as a lab technician in the photo dept. at a daily newspaper. We ran a hell of a lot of film through a Wing Lynch and hand prcessed B&W. We used stainless reels. It was fun. When a photographer would get back on deadline from something that generated a lot of film, like an NFL football game, he or she would usually seek help rolling rilm for the W.L. The machine held 10 rolls at a time, IIRC. We'd go into the film room, line up the reels and canisters and the race was on. Head to head competition....one counter mounted opener...

    Point of pride not to get skunked, rolling less than half before the other person did. The aim was to do 6 to the other's 4, skunking them.

    We got fast.

  7. #27
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,280
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    I've broken one film - through being too heavy-handed on the film advance lever. But that was outdoors, in winter, in temperatures below -40...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  8. #28
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,197
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    435
    Yet another vote for the Hewes/King Koncept/Jobo Stainless reels. Whatever brand they're being sold under, the 35mm ones are super easy to work with, because they have these little squared-off teeth at the core which make it very easy to line up the start of your roll. Just get the teeth in the sprocket holes, bend your roll of film widthways a litte, and start winding. The 120 reels are a little less convenient because of the spring clip, but still quite easy. Once you have it started, either it pulls a Barbra Streisand and goes like buttah, or you'll know real fast that you're out of alignment, so you just back it out and start over, slowly.

    Oh, Stainless tanks CAN go bad... although it is rare. I had one that the side of the tank actually cracked. After some discussion, it was considered that the tank probably had a flaw in it, which explains why it broke there.

  9. #29
    DieHipsterDie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    73
    Looking at pictures of a Hewes reel, I don't see how they are any different than the impossible to load Omega steel reels I have now.

    Can someone explain how they are better?

  10. #30
    Flotsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    S.E. New York State
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by DieHipsterDie View Post
    Looking at pictures of a Hewes reel, I don't see how they are any different than the impossible to load Omega steel reels I have now.

    Can someone explain how they are better?
    One of the biggest difficulties of loading SS reels is getting the film initially straight and centered at the start. Hewes reels grab two opposite sprocket holes at the very beginning making sure that all the roll starts right every time. After that winding the rest of the roll is a breeze. Also, the wires are are a bit thicker making them sturdier than others.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin