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Thread: Thermometers...

  1. #11
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    I feel any thermometer that can be 'adjusted' is inherently wrong and I use one to determine water temperature on the hot plate when brewing stock chemistries. But when it comes to Jobo processing or making a working solution from stock I use the non-mercury glass tube similar to the one Craig mentions in his post.

  2. #12
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Taylor 9842:

    http://www.amazon.com/Taylor-9842-Pr.../dp/B00009WE45

    Waterproof it ain't. I have to take the battery cover/cork out and let it dry out now and then. However, it is accurate and fast.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  3. #13
    PeterB's Avatar
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    Accuracy of thermometers

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce (Camclicker) View Post
    I feel any thermometer that can be 'adjusted' is inherently wrong
    Hi Bruce, why do you say that?

    If anything, a thermometer that can be adjusted is easier to calibrate. Certainly an adjustable themrometer is easier to "knock" out of cal. but usually there is a locking nut to stop that happening.

    Nothing holds its accuracy forever which is why even Liquid-in-glass (LIG) thermometers require checking. If you think it is not possible for an LIG thermometer to go out of cal, think again !! See here and here for my previous posts on the topic.

    regards
    Peter
    Last edited by PeterB; 12-11-2006 at 04:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14

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    I've got an old patterson thermometer from my dad. he used it in the 70's. its old but its in perfect working condition. it's made of glass to breakable yes but it does the job very good.

    to Ole, my indexfinger is not capable of telling that my temperature is 20 or 24 degrees when developing film.

    Reinder

  5. #15

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    I have been using the same digital thermometer for the past 4 years. It is one used by food inspectors that I paid a whopping $13 for. I have checked it and it is quite accurate.

  6. #16

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    To calibrate a digital thermometer, place it in a glass of ice water. It should read exactly 0C

  7. #17
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by ijsbeer View Post
    to Ole, my indexfinger is not capable of telling that my temperature is 20 or 24 degrees when developing film.
    I've checked repeatedly against a good (mercury) lab thermometer, and "a little too warm" is about 20.4C, "getting cold" is about 19.7C. 24 degrees is definitely hot! Since that's about the precision I expect from a decent thermometer, I keep mine safely stored away except for occasional "index checks".

    In a way i'm just using a real, indexed, digital temperature sensor
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  8. #18

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    I use a medium priced dial one that I got from a photo store. I have access to a Kodak mercury process thermometer, and when compared to that, it is right on. I have found that the dial ones, which I find easier to use, are more suseptible to a knock, but of course glass will break. The difference being you can bang your dial themometer out of whack, but it if still works you may not realize it is out a few degrees untill it is too late, but if you break the glass, you know you need a new one!
    All of these should be checked from time to time, but mainly they need to be consistent. If it is one or two degrees high or low, it won't really make a difference, as long it and your method is reliable.
    Refering to another point that a previous poster mentioned, the mercury themometer that I check against is has a stainless steel surround, which makes it safer, and it also can be used as a stir stick. I have no idea if these can still be bought from Kodak, but they were available from them in the past.

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