Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,905   Posts: 1,521,319   Online: 1143
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    13
    I am thinking about mounting photos using dry mount press. The book that I have suggests that press must be as large as the largest prints I intend to mount. Otherwise mounted sections where mounting overlaps will one day buckle. I print up to 20x24 and the press to do it cost over $2000 and weights 275 pounds. Any comments/experiences with smaller presses?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    I have a Seal 210 M and can comfortably mount 11x14. The 16x20's I mounted I had to do in two stages, but it worked fine. The seal 210 can be found on E bay a substancial discounts, and new should run you about $800. It is still heavy, but if you can find a used one in good shape you will not regret it. I beleive the opening for the 210 will be big enough for the 20x24 but you better check before you buy it. Light impressions as well as many other sites has them and the specs.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Oregon and Austria
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    833
    I have an older Seal 210 that I regularly use to mount 16x20 prints to 22x28 board. It takes two passes. I use Seal Buffer Mount (formerly Archival Mount) which bonds as it cools and has fewer mismount problems than the conventional types of mounting tissues. Just make sure you use a thickness of (clean) mat board between press and work to make sure you get no mounting lines. With a little practice you could probably even mount larger prints, putting a quarter of the work at a time into the press for a total of four passes. Unless you are really planning to print a lot of larger prints, try the 210 or equivalent and see if it does the job for you. If you find you have need (and room for) a larger press, you can always sell the smaller one on eBay. Alternately, for the occaisional huge print, you can have a professional mounting shop do the job for you. Regards ;^D)

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    7
    I also use an older Seal 210 press that I acquired from e bay and have not had any problems with mounting up to 20 x 24 inch prints. I would suggest getting the smaller press and trying it out. If you made a mistake, you can always re-sell the press on e bay and go for the larger one. But IMO you will probably do ok with the smaller one.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2
    Could anyone tell me the difference between a Seal Professional 210 and a Biengang/Seal 210M. I am a high school teacher and need to get one for the classroom.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    Quote Originally Posted by vpfaff
    Could anyone tell me the difference between a Seal Professional 210 and a Biengang/Seal 210M. I am a high school teacher and need to get one for the classroom.


    To respond to your question, it seems that Seal/Biengang is the current manufacturers trade name. The 210 M seems to be same as the press that I bought a number of years ago. They do also have a model 210 MX that has an electronic temperature control as opposed to the conventional thermostat that the 210 M incorporates.

    I don't see where the Professional 210 comes up in my sources. Perhaps I just didn't see it.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    123
    For really large mounting jobs where the cost of a press would be prohibitive, consider wet mounting.

    A damp fiber print can be mounted to water-resistant board such as masonite or gator foam, using wallpaper paste, Elmer's (slightly dilute) white glue applied with a paint roller, or an archival equivalent.

    Kodak's (now discontinued) single-weight mural paper could be squeegied, sopping wet from the wash tank, onto board coated with dry Elmer's glue. The wet print would re-activate the glue. Just leave to air-dry (horizontal - without weights) overnight.

    This method not only solves the two problems of bulky drymount press storage and high cost, but also eliminates the difficulties of drying fiber paper without curls.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    memphis
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by vpfaff
    Could anyone tell me the difference between a Seal Professional 210 and a Biengang/Seal 210M. I am a high school teacher and need to get one for the classroom.
    Just a FYI....Biengang is a division of Hunt's corp. Last year Hunt's bought Seal and evidently they have placed Seal in the Biengang division. One thing I didn't like is Hunt's dropped MT-5 from the lineup of and recommends Colormount instead.

    I have a 30 year old Seal Commerical 210 press and it is little changed from the current model 210.
    Ron
    Memphis

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,641
    I have a Technal model 500 dry mount press. They can be acquired used for somewhat less than a similiar Seal press. Have mounted 16X20 prints by rotating them.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    168
    Boris - here is the secret (don't let anyone else in on it...)

    Put an ad in the local paper in the "wanted" section. You will be surprised what you can dredge up. I picked up a Seal 360M (26" x 34") for $100. I added about $60 in cleanup & upgrades (all new wiring, connectors, added a solid state relay, etc). The ad cost me $7.
    Those who don't think Photographers have the skills of REAL artists such as painters obviously have not had to spot my prints.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin