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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    South Pasadena, CA USA
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    Howdy Wise Ones...

    I currently have one of those Jobo drying tents for rollfim, but it doesn't fit very many sheets. So I am looking for altervative ways to dry sheets in quantities of ten or so. 4x5 and 8x10. How do you do it? And do you do anything special to keep dust out of the mix?

    dgh

    David G Hall

  2. #2

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    Sep 2002
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    Omaha, Nebraska
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    I made a tent to dry 35mm out of a 5gl plastic pail, a clear shower current and some small air vents used on coputer cases.

    Use the lid from the bucket for the top. Cut out a couple of holes for two of the vents and glue in place. Use some stiff wire (even a coat hanger will work) and make 2 or 3 guides that you can hang film from. Cut out some holes in sides or bottom of the bucket for vents. Then use sticky back velcro to hold the shower curtain around the lid and bucket. Drill a hole and put a hook with a nut on the other side through the lid to hang it from the ceiling. You an hang as many a dozen rolls of film at one time.

    When I hang my film I open the flap enough to reach in with the film still rolled or on the reel in a container of photo-flo. I pull the film out or through the solution inside the tent and then hang with an alligator clip with some lead melted in the wire end from the bottom, held at the top with a clothes pin or alligator clip at the top.

    With the three guides you can also hang up to 9 4x5s at one time. Total cost about $6.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  3. #3

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    Jan 2003
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    South Pasadena, CA USA
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    Jim,

    What a great idea, but I am having a hard time envisioning it. Is there any way you could post or email a picture of it? I'm very interested.

    Thanks!

    dgh
    David G Hall

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Amongst the cornfields & rednecks of central Indiana
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    116
    I use a contraption that is a large piece of pvc that the whole reel fits in. Underneath it is a piece of plexiglass that keeps the dripping water diverted into a pan and an infrared/red heat lamp underneath the whole mess shining the heat up into the tube. This allows a rising heat tunnel throughout the tube. I put the whole tube, plexi, tray and lamp assembly inside a large portable closet/clothes storage bag which I have cut out the bottom and sewed mess (tulle) into and has cheap, cut & fit air conditioner filters placed over the mess. This is repeated at the top of the bag. The heat from the lamp rises, through the tube and over the film and reels, drying the film and reels without forcing any air around the film. The bag keeps the dust out and the filters allow air movement without introducing dust into the mix.

    When I get done with my film (I shoot mostly 120 & 220), I'll run in my Jobo, dip in Photoflo for 30 secs or so, shake the excess off and drop the roll down into the PVC tube. I close the bag and turn on the lamp. In about 20 minutes, the film and reels are dry, no marks, no dust, no spots.

    Done this for over 300 some rolls and haven't had a single problem yet, no matter if it was C-41, E-6, or B&W...

    You could do the same, but without the tube structure and clip the film inside the top of the bag on lines that you've punched through the closet (it's the kind on a rack with a fiber and plastic bag that zips up) keep some plexi or glass at the bottom in a 45 degree angle and put the heat lamp underneath. The rising heat vortex does really well. I've done this for sheet films when I shoot them.

  5. #5
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Oct 2002
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    Northern England on the Scottish border
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    I purchased an old engineers metal storage cupboard that is just about the same size as the very expensive professional film dryers. After washing it to remove the years of accumulated grime I lined it out with thin polystyrene and installed a small tube type 100watt greenhouse heater. I attached nylon cord similar to that used to start a chain saw, in rows along the top to hang the film. I can dry 12 rolls of film or 9 4 x 5 sheets. The total cost was 25 pounds sterling.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  6. #6
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Jan 2003
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    ..

  7. #7
    ann
    ann is offline

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    Sep 2002
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    We use a plastic clothing bag that can be purchased at many stores. Cost $25 can hang about 25 rolls of film in it. I ran some wire across the top of the bag, got some clothes pins and there we are.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  8. #8

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    Dave,
    Just think of a cylinder with the lid on top, the drum on the bottom and the plastic in between.

    It is basically a round lid from a 5gal drum at the top. The top of the plastic shower curtain hangs from the lid, held on with velcro.

    The bottom of the shower curtain wraps around the bucket, also held on by velcro. You cut the curtain so you have just enough material to go around and have a 2or 3" overlap with a couple of velcro tabs to close it up after the film is hung. Use anything you want for a system to hang the film from.

    If the place you hang it is fairly isolated without any foot traffic, you can skip the drum at the bottom and let the plastic just hang from the lid. I used the bucket because dust would get kicked up from people walking buy and the shower curtain material was not long enough to reach the floor when hanging from the ceiling.

    You also don't need to have any vents, but it does speed up the process.

    Hope this clears it up a little. If I can figure out how to use my Wife's new digital camera I will take a picture and then try to figure out how to post it.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    South Pasadena, CA USA
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    470
    Doc,

    Very intriguing. You sound very inventive...from walloping someone with the monopod to figuring out a heat vortex.

    So the heat lamp does nothing to the plexiglass thing? No melting?

    I'm going to try this. I'll probably come back and bug you with more questions.

    Thanks!

    dgh
    David G Hall

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Amongst the cornfields & rednecks of central Indiana
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    116
    Just keep the lamp a good 1-2 feet away and use a dimmer on it to control the "heat". You could also use a couple of 100 watt lightbulbs to do the same, but I'd rather not have a softbox in the corner.

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