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  1. #11
    Lee L's Avatar
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    For safelights I use DC and AC LED arrays. For intermittent white light when switching back and forth from safelights, I use white AC and DC LED arrays. For general set up and clean up, measuring and mixing chemicals, and judging color balance I use daylight balanced high CRI (color rendition index) fluorescent tubes and spirals. I turn off the fluorescents far enough ahead of using light sensitive materials for the glow to dissipate. Used in reflectors pointed at the ceiling, the glow from spiral fluorescents is not a problem after a few seconds.

    Lee

  2. #12
    Black Dog's Avatar
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    I've been everywhere ooooohhh yeaahhhh still I'm standing tall.
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    Darkroom lighting....that's easy-as little as possible !
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

  3. #13
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    If you use incandescent bulbs, dimmers on room and safelight circuits can reduce light and heat.

  4. #14
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    I agree with the heat buildup issue in a small darkroom in Austin.

    Also, don't put all of the lights in the midline of the room or else you will always be casting a shadow on the workspace.

    I have to large globes in the middle of the room, each with two 75 watt incandescent bulbs for general lighting. I also have a separate set of several recessed cans with 75 watt halogen bulbs for task lighting.

    You might consider some track lighting over the workspaces so that you can adjust it over time as your work habits change.

    I was tempted to get one of the Thomas Duplex safelights which are very nice but far too bright for a regular darkroom without some heroic dimming efforts. Failed my paper fogging test.

    Put some thought into how you will turn on/off the lights from where you are standing while you work.
    Jerold Harter MD

  5. #15

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    Ok, this is great, lots of good insight.

    So, since the room has 10-ft ceilings, I'm thinking now that instead of canned lighting I should make some simple drops out of conduit and hang 'em at around 8' with some sort of globe to disperse the light from the room lights (incandescent) ... and use dimmers.

    Nathan

  6. #16
    Pragmatist's Avatar
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    Get Creative

    Can lights are often adjustable with lamp depth, and a wide variety of lamp configurations (different bulbs yield different flood patterns). Here are a couple shots of how I set up my darkroom. On the enlarger side, two wide spots on a dimmer circuit provide light exactly where I want it--while the Kodak 8x10 safelight adequately illuminates the easel and work area for both enlargers at print time.

    A choice was made to use two Kodak "bullet" type safelights, along with a bar of three wide floods on a dimmer over on the wet side. One safelight is aimed down at the development tray position, and the other swings around to cover the center worktable and print dryer. Note the central control mounted at ceiling height--access to dimmers for the floods and switches for the safelight positions.

    Additional incandescent clamp light is available in the toning position of the sink. At the spotting and negative positions, fluorescent light of 5000K/98CRI is provided. Generally, when using fluorescents wait at least eight minutes before getting happy with film or paper. Color is another matter--with films like Ektachrome you may find a fogging issue up to 15 minutes after using the light. Best to not have used them for at least half an hour if you have any in the darkroom.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails _MG_0961.png   _MG_0962.png   _MG_0968.png  
    Patrick

    something witty and profound needs to be inserted here...

  7. #17
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    As a safety item, I have my wet side white lights, operated by a string pull switch from the ceiling.

    The idea is that one day with continual on and off switching with moisture on my hands, it may just possibly lead to conditions where there is enough moisture to cause a current leakage inside the actual switch.

    In eighteen years I have worn out one ceiling string pull switch from use, I think the second one is about to go.

    Mick.

  8. #18
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    One thing I find quite useful is to have my main room light on a remote control - that way I can switch it on from anywhere in the room. I have a light over where the fixer or washer tray goes for inspection on a pull-switch and an LED safelight which is on all the time.

    Have fun, Bob.

  9. #19
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Fagan View Post
    ...I have my wet side white lights, operated by a string pull switch from the ceiling.
    You can also turn on the lights with your teeth, which is handy after processing negatives in trays because of fixer dripping fingers.

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  10. #20

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    Lee L,

    Would it be possible for you to describe how to construct an LED safelight array?

    Tom.

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