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  1. #11
    jnanian's Avatar
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    with the "clip test"
    you take a small bit of your favorite film
    that is exposed by room light
    and see how long it takes to clear.
    ( do this before using the mixed fix for the first time )
    when it takes 2x the original time to clear, change your fixer it is spent.

    works every time ...

  2. #12
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    First off, never put the fixer test solution into your fixer. It will decrease the power of the fixer! You must remove a small fixed quantity of your used fixer into a glass container and then drop in a few drops of the test solution.

    You will see a YELLOW heavy cloudy precipitate form if the fixer is exhausted. A white precipitate does not indicate exhaustion.


    PE
    PE: thank you for the advice on not putting test into the fix. Either my little bottle does not say that or I didn't read the fine print.

    Second, I'm assuming a white precipitate precedes the yellow precipitate by some number of prints? If so, am I correct in assuming that dumping the fixer when the white precipitate appears gives a safety margin vs. waiting until the yellow appears?


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  3. #13
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    There will be an early amount of precipitate just because any silver is present, but stirring will cause it to vanish as the hypo dissolves it. The yellow precipitate will form and stay there. It usually settles to the bottom of the beaker as well, but the white stuff generally looks like a wisp of smoke in air.

    Iodide in fix slows it down, so continuing to test will gradually weaken the fix if the test solution is dropped into the tray. Also, the test can be rendered inaccurate due to the volume of fix in the tray (or tank).

    Using a fixed amount generally damps out the fluctuations in this test and renders it more accurate.

    PE

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