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  1. #11
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Where's that Winogrand film that someone posted a while back? He handles the negs with his bare hands and just cuts them up with a big scissors. I forget if he was doing it on a light table. I guess if he found a keeper among the hundreds of thousands of exposures, he just cleaned the neg.
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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Richards View Post
    I found a ROWI cutter in a bargain barrel at a shop in Germany -- 8 Euro as I recall. It's works as jordanstar described. Don't know how I ever got along without it. You should be able to find something equivalent on ebay or the large photo dealers.
    Mike I have the exact same machine and it has all the benefits as set out by jordanstar. OP - It is worth obtaining. I think it was originally made to allow home processed slide film to be cut for insertion into home processed slide mounts

    I occasionally have one small problem with mine which may be my machine rather than ROWI cutters in general. It sometimes slightly "chews" rather than cleanly cuts the second edge of the film. I press the two film holding tabs on top with the first and second finger to ensure the film is held firm and straight in the slot and have tried bringing the curved guillotine cutter down at different speeds.

    Is there a knack to using the guillotine which I have failed to master?Other than mentioning holding the film down as stated and bringing the guillotine down straight the instructions give no warning about any danger of not cutting cleanly.

    Of course the edge can be trimmed afterwards with scissors but as the frame gaps are very small, this sometimes involves cutting to the very edge of the frame.

    Does the guillotine edge need sharpening? Obviously if I could make a clean cut every time this would be much better.

    Thanks

    pentaxuser

  3. #13

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    Talk of film cutters for slide film made me curious. It seems that B&H, at least, still carries a couple of these:



    Based on the photo, I think the cheaper one could be used for cutting negatives into strips, but I'm not sure it'd be any easier than using scissors. The photo of the more expensive one is smaller and so I'm not sure how useful it'd be for this function.

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I use scissors some times, and a small guillotine cutter other times. I prefer the cutter, but it only works really well if it is on a lighted support.

    The one thing that does drive me nuts is trying to do this with someone else's scissors, because I am left handed.

    Matt

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by DannL View Post
    After the film has dried, and while it is still hanging, I also cut using ordinary scissors. Counting from the bottom I cut between every sixth frame. It does take practice, and occasionally I miss the mark. Good lighting helps.
    This is exactly what I do, too. Additionally, I have found that short scissors are easier for me to control than long bladed/handled scissors.

  6. #16
    Mike Richards's Avatar
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    ROWI Cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Mike I have the exact same machine and it has all the benefits as set out by jordanstar. OP - It is worth obtaining. I think it was originally made to allow home processed slide film to be cut for insertion into home processed slide mounts

    I occasionally have one small problem with mine which may be my machine rather than ROWI cutters in general. It sometimes slightly "chews" rather than cleanly cuts the second edge of the film. I press the two film holding tabs on top with the first and second finger to ensure the film is held firm and straight in the slot and have tried bringing the curved guillotine cutter down at different speeds.

    Is there a knack to using the guillotine which I have failed to master?Other than mentioning holding the film down as stated and bringing the guillotine down straight the instructions give no warning about any danger of not cutting cleanly.

    Of course the edge can be trimmed afterwards with scissors but as the frame gaps are very small, this sometimes involves cutting to the very edge of the frame.

    Does the guillotine edge need sharpening? Obviously if I could make a clean cut every time this would be much better.

    Thanks

    pentaxuser
    I haven't really experienced the cutting problems you describe. The guillotine cutter doesn't make quite as clean an edge as a scissors, but it's not really bothersome. I wonder if we have exactly the same design or model? Mine doesn't seem to have tabs as you describe -- the film is threaded through the slots and finally under an aluminum piece across the film just before the cutter. I've used it for well over 50 films with no problem.
    Mike Richards' Mobile Me gallery, including the Holocaust and Turkey Expo.

  7. #17

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    A sharp scissor and not such a crappy one works for me over 40 years.
    Unless you have drunk too much the day before it's not a problem

  8. #18

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    The one thing that does drive me nuts is trying to do this with someone else's scissors, because I am left handed.
    Indeed, you have right and left handed scissors.....

  9. #19

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    Scissors are absolutely useless on film - they just bend it over and over and after about twenty attempts they'll eventually hack through leaving very frayed edges. I use a scalpel on a cutting mat - one nice neat cut.

  10. #20
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Scissors are absolutely useless on film - they just bend it over and over and after about twenty attempts they'll eventually hack through leaving very frayed edges.
    Hmnm -- time for a sharpening and adjustment or a new pair of scissors! I cut my strips down to fit in file pages using the four finger stretch shown earlier and find the film cuts cleanly first try. These are scissors reserved for paper and film and never allowed near sheet metal, screen wire or other potentially dulling items.

    DaveT

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