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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Albertz View Post
    I also recommend getting an oil-filled radiator heater. They sell for around 30 to 60 USD, heat up quickly, include a thermostat, and keep warm for a long while. I have used one during my Nova Scotia days and was very happy with it. No increase in electricity consumption detected... Regards, Markus Albertz
    Yeah, those are really great. There's a 1500W limit (at least in my part of Canada) on 110V AC heaters (because most household circuits are rated to only 15 amps), but for some reason the 1500W oil-filled radiators seem more effective than the fan-coil heaters despite the same power consumption.

    I had one that a friend gave me for free and it took awhile to warm up but was incredibly effective once it got going; unfortunately it conked out after a few cold nights. Just bad luck I guess.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  2. #22
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    Can't believe you need heat in Portland. But if you do, I second the oil radiator - quiet, no dust, pleasant heat.

    Also, you might add one or two of these radiant floor mats:

    http://cozywinters.com/shop/tfw.html

    The mats can have a rubber smell which dissipates with time.
    Jerold Harter MD

  3. #23
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    If you are handy and want to install some new flooring in your basement look at these:

    http://www.warmyourfloor.com/index.a...TS&Category=23
    Jerold Harter MD

  4. #24
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    another heating idea

    I have a cool darkroom too - but not quite as chilly as yours. Mine gets doiwn to about 17C over the winter. The up side is that mixed stock solutions last for a long time before they oxidize off when kept so cool. Paper does not go back in the fridge every night, like in the summer, either. I have an old microwave oven near the darkroom , next door on a shelf in the laundry. When starting a session, or when a tray gets too cool, I just pop the storage jug or even a small tray of chemistry into the microwave for a half a minute or so. and we are ready to print again.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    Yes. Combustible heaters, without chimneys or dedicated exhaust tubes that run outside, aren't meant for indoor use. They consume oxygen and they output toxic gas. The heat is basically the same as the exhaust (simplification, but effectively true), so if you have adequate ventilation you won't stay warm and the whole schebang is pointless.
    Amen!

    I am an engineer and works in the energy industry and am thankful that the originator of this post brought this subject up so we could properly diffuse the ignorant assumption that a combustion heater can be used indoors with proper ventilation. Absolutely NO under ANY circumstances. We all want every photographer to be safe and alive so please give the propane heater back to your friend and use a safe alternative.

    With high energy prices hundreds of people lose their lives each year to this form of carbon monoxide poisioning in their desire to stay warm and it is most unfortunate in the information age we currently live in. Ignorance is no excuse.

  6. #26

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    To clarify, there ARE ventless propane heaters intended for indoor, occupied spaces, but they tend to be lower rated units, and are generally more expensive. Even when using one of these, you should still ensure more than the suggested ventilation and use a battery-operated CO monitor with audible alarm. And it's very important to follow the directions for cleaning to make sure the unit burns efficiently, and thus minimizes CO output.

  7. #27
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    This seems to be the most useful thread I ever started.

    For the record, yes it does get cold in Portland but it is a damp cold. I already have all the heater types, including the oil filled type which is inaffective in my drafty basement, but am trying to refrain from running 1500 watts all day or running the house gas furnace both of which take money I would rather spend on film and paper. I was of the impression that the propane heater was for indoors as that is what I was told though clearly incorrectly, but I had seen indoor versions advertised and that is why I gave it a try. So I am stupid but.. well OK I am that stupid. But if my stupidity is useful then I am temporarily glad of it.

    Hey I would rather deal with cold in Winter than hot in Summer. But I might have to get one of those pig warmers.
    Dennis

  8. #28

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    Maybe get some pigs instead. They put out heat, and when it's warm enough again, you can convert them to bacon. Mmmmmm . . . baaaaaaconnnnnnn . . . .

  9. #29
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terence View Post
    Maybe get some pigs instead. They put out heat, and when it's warm enough again, you can convert them to bacon. Mmmmmm . . . baaaaaaconnnnnnn . . . .
    The smell of the pig poop will kill you in that basement!! :o:o:o:o:o

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #30
    Snapshot's Avatar
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    With regards to space heaters, are the running costs prohibitive? My basement is cold (hovering around 60F) and it's hard to maintain chemistry temperatures.
    "The secret to life is to keep your mind full and your bowels empty. Unfortunately, the converse is true for most people."

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