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  1. #21
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xia_Ke View Post
    Thanks Louie This may not be the thread to ask but, stupid newbie question, so is the holding rinse just a tray for keeping your developed prints before moving on to washing or a second fix? One question about your screen set-up, I want to do glossy prints. Would placing the prints face down cause imprinting in the emulsion? Thanks again for your help.

    Aaron
    Yes - a holding tray is simply a tray of water that the prints go into after they have been fixed. The idea is to keep them wet so that it is easy to later move to whatever post-processing sequence you want to follow. I generally use the Ilford fast fix process (one fix, "film strength" ammonium thiosulfate, for about a minute), so my post process consists of rinse, hypoclear, selenium toning, hypoclear, and wash. But others use the two bath fix process, and the second bath would be part of their post-processing sequence.

    When you say "glossy", do you mean industrial-strength mirror finish, or do you mean that soft, rich texture of glossy paper that has been air dried? There is a big difference! To get a high gloss on FB paper you must ferrotype your prints. Ferrotyping is a PITA - you have to have the plates, you have to keep them immaculately clean and must wax them before each use, and you have to allow for the possibility that the ferrotyping process will damage a print. Also, there is the logistics issue that your throughput is constrained by the number of plates you own and whether you use a heat dryer to speed the process. Frankly, if you want high gloss today, the easier way to get there is to use RC paper.

    But if you want the air-dried loo, then screens are an easy and effective way to go. Squeegee the prints (I lay the each print face-down on a large sheet of glass, squeegee, and then filp it over to squeegee the front), and then gently lay them out on the screens to dry. I find that they will be dry enough to stack in about 12 hours, and its possible to speed that up a bit by using a small fan to blow air over the screens.

    I have never had a problem with screen impressions on conventional silver prints. I have seen screen impressions on some Pt/Pd prints, especially those made on more fragile papers like Weston Diploma Parchment, so I dry those face up.
    Louie

  2. #22
    Xia_Ke's Avatar
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    Thanks for clarifying Louie That's what I figured but, wanted to be sure. For the glossy, I'm not sure I have seen the difference between the two. I just know that I like a nice shiny finish. Matte, lustre, and pearls are nice, just not the direction I want to go. I really wish I could see results printed on various papers to help decide. I noticed Kentmere had a sampler available at Freestyle that I might pick up. Who knows, we'll see. SO many options and still a little more time to ponder my direction

    Aaron
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    "A good photograph is one that makes the viewer so aware of the subject that they are unaware of the print."- Kodak
    "...if you find afterwards that you made a mistake, the price of the film and chemicals was...tuition!" - greybeard
    "The hard part isnít the decisive moment or anything like that Ė itís getting the film on the reel!" - John Szarkowski

  3. #23

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    Xia_ke
    If you have ever seen an old drugstore print with the high gloss finish, that is a ferrotype finish. A glossy finish on fiber paper is much more subdued.
    Re:Monophoto's comment about ferrotyping being a PITA. He's NOT kidding.
    I think the screen frame kits is a lot easier than builing/finishing though.
    You buy the frame to size, they assemble with "l" brackets like some picture frames, & install screening. It's a bit more expensive, but you don't need to finish them, they're thinner and you don't need to be ripping the lumber to size.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  4. #24
    Xia_Ke's Avatar
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    Thanks John Can't say that I have seen an old drugstore print If ferrotyping is that much of a PITA, we'll save that for later... much later. For screen frame kits, are you referring to regular home type screens? So something I would order from the local hardware store or is this something a photography store might do?
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    "A good photograph is one that makes the viewer so aware of the subject that they are unaware of the print."- Kodak
    "...if you find afterwards that you made a mistake, the price of the film and chemicals was...tuition!" - greybeard
    "The hard part isnít the decisive moment or anything like that Ė itís getting the film on the reel!" - John Szarkowski

  5. #25
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xia_Ke View Post
    Thanks John Can't say that I have seen an old drugstore print If ferrotyping is that much of a PITA, we'll save that for later... much later. For screen frame kits, are you referring to regular home type screens? So something I would order from the local hardware store or is this something a photography store might do?
    You can buy screen frames from Home Depot for $X. Or you can order special photographic screen frames from a speciality supplier like Calumet. They will cost you something like $5X.

    It's ALWAYS less expensive to be creative with readily available commodity items than it is to buy specialty items for photography (or boats, or just about any other adult hobby).
    Louie

  6. #26
    Xia_Ke's Avatar
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    Thanks Louie I have a couple friends that work in construction. I should just bribe them with a 6 pack to make me something...LOL
    flickr

    "A good photograph is one that makes the viewer so aware of the subject that they are unaware of the print."- Kodak
    "...if you find afterwards that you made a mistake, the price of the film and chemicals was...tuition!" - greybeard
    "The hard part isnít the decisive moment or anything like that Ė itís getting the film on the reel!" - John Szarkowski

  7. #27

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    I should just bribe them with a 6 pack
    That would be a good way, I bought a kit from Home Depot that cost 10 $'s or so, my screen is about 5 feet by 3 feet to fit the top of the tub enclosure. In addition to the kit, you may need to buy the little tool that forces the fabric into the channel in the frame, plus you might need a hacksaw. The six pack might be cheaper, although there is a lot to be said for projects that require additions to your tool collection

    FWIW, I agree with Monophoto and John, ferrotyping is too much of a hassle for a learning experience, when you can get a nice glossy surface with RC and no effort or hard to find equipment.

  8. #28
    Xia_Ke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    ...The six pack might be cheaper, although there is a lot to be said for projects that require additions to your tool collection...
    True but, I already most everything I need. I would like to get a nice bandsaw and tablesaw but, living in an apartment, I don't exactly have room. Besides, the more I spend on tools and other crap, the less I have to spend on the necessities... film, paper, and chemicals Priorities, it's all about priorities...LOL
    flickr

    "A good photograph is one that makes the viewer so aware of the subject that they are unaware of the print."- Kodak
    "...if you find afterwards that you made a mistake, the price of the film and chemicals was...tuition!" - greybeard
    "The hard part isnít the decisive moment or anything like that Ė itís getting the film on the reel!" - John Szarkowski

  9. #29
    Xia_Ke's Avatar
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    Alright, I've been doing a lot of reading/researching on different enlargers and I think I have narrowed it down to 2. Right now I'm leaning towards either an Omega B-22 or one of the Beseler 23C versions. Both are plentiful and reasonably priced on the used market and seem to have plenty of spare parts available if needed. Does anyone have any thoughts on these one way or the other? Thanks again for all the help.

    Aaron
    flickr

    "A good photograph is one that makes the viewer so aware of the subject that they are unaware of the print."- Kodak
    "...if you find afterwards that you made a mistake, the price of the film and chemicals was...tuition!" - greybeard
    "The hard part isnít the decisive moment or anything like that Ė itís getting the film on the reel!" - John Szarkowski

  10. #30

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    Good Morning, Aaron,

    Assuming that you can get a good price (shouldn't be too hard) and the enlarger is in good condition, favor the 23C; if you succumb to GAS and get into larger-format negatives, the 23C will handle them, up to 6 x 9.

    Konical

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