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  1. #11

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    D-76 and ID-11 are both based on the same published D-76 formula, but one or both deviate from this formula in proprietary ways. I've only used D-76, not ID-11, but I doubt if you'd be able to discern much difference between the two, as a practical matter. In other words, my recommendation is to use whichever one is more readily available and/or less expensive.

    As to fractions, with D-76 one common way to use it is diluted 1+1 -- that is, one part of stock solution to one part plain water. This is pretty easy. If your tank uses 300ml of chemistry for one roll of film, just use 150ml of stock solution and 150ml of water. Some developers are commonly used with stranger dilutions, but if you stick to D-76 and 1+1 dilution, it's pretty simple. Alternatively, you could use D-76 at full strength, but that'll either cost you twice as much or bring you into replenishment territory, which is a bit of a nuisance.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    Uhm.... you can click the link to the video in my sig. There are four parts. It's designed to be helpful. (hopefully)

    (Jim, your five bucks is in the mail)

    YES!

  3. #13
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    I don't disagree with anything anyone has said, but I would suggest an alternative developer: HC-110. The main advantage here is that the solution as you purchase it will last essentially forever. On the other hand, D-76 or ID-11 will last about 6 months once you mix it from the powder.

    So if you're not processing a lot of film, it may save you a bit of money in the longer run.

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  4. #14
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Let's be methodical...

    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    Hi,
    1- Can I use one developer for Neopan/Tri-X/Ilford including ISO from 100 to 400 or is it better to use brand specific developer for each film brand?
    Yes, if you're doing what the average photographer does: pictures of people, places that are "realistic." D-76/ID-11/XTOL/HC-110 are "average" developers. They work for most applications, have similar (albeit slightly different) image properties, and will be easy to buy, use, and master.

    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    2-Should I buy a tent or seal my bathroom? If the tent is just as reliable, I´d rather do that than sit in the dark.
    You need darkness only for loading spiral reels (by your handle, I guess you do 35mm). Go with what is cheapest, easiest. And trust me, you don't even need perfect darkness! I've loaded 400 ISO film in a room with light leaks, and as long as your film is not directly in line with the leaks, you're fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    3-How do I keep temperature constant? This has always been my fear.
    You're only doing B&W, not E6, so don't panic! Just leave everything at room temperature! Most homes average 20C. The only temperature that really matters is the developer. You should make sure you always use it around the same temp. You can vary of a few degrees (+/-2C, let's say) without big troubles. If your developer is too cold/hot before you use it, just put the bottle in a tub of hot/cold water until it reaches the temperature. It won't vary significantly while you use it.

    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    4-Finally, what equipment should I get?
    Go for Paterson tanks and reels for 35mm. They're cheap and plentiful on the used market, well designed, and easy to use.

    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    Many thanks in advance for feedback.

    Robert.
    Hope it's helpful!
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  5. #15
    Snapshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    Uhm.... you can click the link to the video in my sig. There are four parts. It's designed to be helpful. (hopefully)

    (Jim, your five bucks is in the mail)
    Your apron makes you look fat.
    "The secret to life is to keep your mind full and your bowels empty. Unfortunately, the converse is true for most people."

  6. #16
    DBP
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    I would second the suggestion of a one-shot developer if you don't do a lot of developing. There are some good instructions for use of HC-110 here http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110/, including the exact amounts of water and developer for various tanks.

    One other item I find useful is a large Slurpee cup. I punched a few small holes around the bottom and use it as a washer by placing the reels in after fixing and slowly running water in the top so it stays at a constant level.

    As for temperature, the only really critical factor is to make sure the temperature is constant throughout the process.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snapshot View Post
    Your apron makes you look fat.
    Ray told me it wasn't the apron!!!

  8. #18
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP View Post
    One other item I find useful is a large Slurpee cup. I punched a few small holes around the bottom and use it as a washer by placing the reels in after fixing and slowly running water in the top so it stays at a constant level.
    Doesn't it scare you that Slurpee cups are large enough to hold film rolls?

    Modern popcorn baskets would probably count as deep tanks...
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  9. #19
    Xia_Ke's Avatar
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    Robert, congrats on deciding to start processing your own. It's very rewarding and now you will have full control to get the results that you want. I was in your same position about 5 months ago. To me, developing B&W seemed like such a huge, daunting task. Once you see how easy it is, you will curse yourself for not starting earlier...LOL I second the recommendation for Patterson tanks/rolls and also agree with the recommendations for HC-110. The Patterson System is very easy to use and cheap as hell on Ebay. HC-110 is easy to find and last forever. Using both dil. B and dil. H I got about 15 rolls of 35mm and 35 rolls of 120 out of one bottle. I use a changing bag for loading reels and usually load mine while sitting in front of the tv, then do my developing in the bathroom. I haven't had any problems developing in various temps ranging from 65F - 76F. I just adjust my dilutions and developing times to suit. Good luck and let us know how you make out

    Aaron
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    "A good photograph is one that makes the viewer so aware of the subject that they are unaware of the print."- Kodak
    "...if you find afterwards that you made a mistake, the price of the film and chemicals was...tuition!" - greybeard
    "The hard part isn’t the decisive moment or anything like that – it’s getting the film on the reel!" - John Szarkowski

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    Just leave everything at room temperature! Most homes average 20C. The only temperature that really matters is the developer. You should make sure you always use it around the same temp. You can vary of a few degrees (+/-2C, let's say) without big troubles. If your developer is too cold/hot before you use it, just put the bottle in a tub of hot/cold water until it reaches the temperature. It won't vary significantly while you use it.
    This is one approach to handle temperature variations. Another is to adjust your development time up or down for lower or higher temperatures, respectively. There are charts and tables to help you do this if you prefer this method. (I'm afraid I don't have any URLs handy, though.)

    Go for Paterson tanks and reels for 35mm. They're cheap and plentiful on the used market, well designed, and easy to use.
    Note that development tank type and design is a topic that brings up lengthy discussions. Some people prefer plastic, others prefer stainless steel, and there are brand preferences within each group. Note that these are personal preference issues; although the reasons for particular preferences can be stated, ultimately it's a matter of what you find convenient or easy to use in practice. As the OP is a beginner, it's impossible to judge what this will be for the OP. I wouldn't want to either encourage or discourage a beginner from getting a specific type or brand of tank. For all the gory details, try doing a search on keywords like "plastic stainless tank reel." That'll turn up a bunch of threads in which this topic has been thrashed to death.

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