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  1. #21

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    Robert, another thing I would suggest is to do a practice run first. Take a roll of film and pull out half. Cut it and trim a leader on the remainder of the roll. Use blank piece to get the hang of loading the film onto the reel. Start out in the light until you get the hang of it. Then do it in the dark or with your eyes closed. With the partial roll of film shoot the trash can, laundry pile, dog laying (lying?) down, etc. You don’t want to experiment with your masterpiece. The quote about film and chemistry being tuition is dead on.

    Good luck and let us know how it turns out.

    Mike

  2. #22
    bessa_L_R3a's Avatar
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    thanks guys, very helpful info indeed ... Of course for my first roll I'll take a 5 minute walk around the block and shoot 36 non-masterpiece exposures and then get down to business!

    As I only expect to do two 35mm rolls at a time (I'm mainly experimenting with Fuji Neopan and Kodak Tri-X), here's my recap of what I'll get based on your collective suggestions:

    -Tent/changing bag/sealed pitch black bathroom (not yet decided)
    -Developer: D76 or HC 110
    -Fixer (Any brand will do I'm guessing?)
    -Wash Aid (essential or not essential?)
    -Tank/Reels
    -Some sort of tub to fill with water at desired temp to keep tank in during development (like a Bain Marie)
    -Measuring vessels for dilution
    -Clips to weigh down negatives after hanging them up
    -Accurate thermometer

    Am I missing anything essential?

    Feel like I'm going to have a baby and you will all be there to witness the newborn ... Gestation will last approximately one week starting today!

    Robert.

  3. #23
    IOS
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    Stop bath !

  4. #24

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    Yep, Stop bath and add a graduate and a swizzel stick for mixing and measuring the chemicals. A Betty Crocker plastic measuring cup from Walmart work if you can find a big enough one for the quantities you'll be mixing, otherwise Patterson makes a good 'un. Oh, and if you've got funky tap water use distilled water for mixing your brews.

  5. #25

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    FWIW, I've never had the need for a "bain marie" when souping B&W. Wooden clothes pins and a bit of line you can string up for hanging the negatves up to dry...and don't for get one of those lil' film retriever dohickies that grab the leader and pull it out so you can start spooling onto the reel, or else you'll need a "church key" to pry the end of the cartridge off if the leader gets sucked waaaay down in there. Plus a clock or timer so you'll know when to change the brew

  6. #26

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    (one more thought) Jugs for storing your chemicals! Wine jugs work nicely if you can find black plastic tops that fit (the metal ones rust) and relabel them so you won't mistake the D-76 for a rather unpretentious chardonnay from the San Joaquin Valley.

  7. #27
    bessa_L_R3a's Avatar
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    J Brunner, your video is fantastic, man. It really ... floats my boat.

    How do you keep the water temp in your big tub of water the same throughout the whole process? Or is that not necessary because it's a lot of liquid so it doesn't change?

    What kind of drying environment is ideal? Low moisture? And how long to dry?
    Last edited by bessa_L_R3a; 01-11-2008 at 08:45 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #28
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    "Wash Aid" : not necessary for film as the fixer washes out easily.

    A bottle-opener can do double-duty to lever off the top of a 35mm cassette, though you can get purpose made openers. I prefer to lever the top off the can rather than pull the film through the light-trap and run the (small) extra risk of a scratch.

    If you can black-out a bathroom that would be ideal as the extra elbow-room and freedom of action over using a changing bag is very worthwhile.

    You might want to add wetting agent to your list. A small amount in a final soak (preferably with distilled water, but that's a belt-and-braces approach) will greatly reduce the chances of drying marks. Don't let it evaporate dry on plastic reels and tanks as it can allegedly build up a residue over time.

    Hanging film to dry in a shower cubicle or over the bath is a good place as the humidity in the bathroom helps keep the dust down (but don't keep stirring up the dust by opening the door). Dust is your worst enemy when it comes to drying film. At normal room temperatures it will take a couple of hours at least to completely dry. I tend to leave it twice as long as I think it needs...

    Have fun, Bob.

  9. #29
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    -Fixer (Any brand will do I'm guessing?)
    Not necessarily. If you go buy in a brick and mortar store, you are more likely to find rapid fixers, with or without hardeners. Take a non-hardened fixer like the one sold by Ilford. Kodak makes three kinds of fixer: powder (it's not rapid, so don't bother using it with film), Kodafix (contains hardener, avoid for now), and a liquid kind that comes in A and B solution, one of which is the hardener. Don't use the hardener solution, and you're fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    -Wash Aid (essential or not essential?)
    Not essential. Useful, but not essential. As long as you stick to using fresh fixer and wash properly, you don't need wash aid.

    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    -Some sort of tub to fill with water at desired temp to keep tank in during development (like a Bain Marie)
    Kind of overkill. Your processing temperature will not change enough during the few minutes you agitate the developer to warrant temp control on the tank. On the other hand, if you plan to do C41 or E6 later, well, this could be an investment that will pay down the road.

    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    Am I missing anything essential?
    I am partial to Edwal's Hypo-Check or other similar solutions. It's a test solution you use to verify your fixer's strength. Put a few drops in fixer, and it will precipitates if your fixer is exhausted. It's useful when you are printing (put a few drops after every X prints to check), or when you reuse fixer.

    Don't forget Photo-Flo and distilled water for the final rinse.

    If you can have some humidity in the room where you dry film, it will help avoid curling (not the Canadian sport!). In the shower, for instance. You open up hot water for a minute or two to build up some humidity, then hang the film, and close the door. Your film will dry slowly. I leave mine overnight because I develop in the evening, but it takes only a few hours.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  10. #30
    bessa_L_R3a's Avatar
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    In JBrunner's video, (as a point of reference), I'm not sure it's clear how many minutes he has the film in chemicals (not including the developer). How long do you have to do your pre-wash, fixer, post wash, wetting, etc ... or does it say all that on the boxes?

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