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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    J Brunner, your video is fantastic, man. It really ... floats my boat.

    How do you keep the water temp in your big tub of water the same throughout the whole process? Or is that not necessary because it's a lot of liquid so it doesn't change?

    What kind of drying environment is ideal? Low moisture? And how long to dry?
    The tray of water is simply used to bring the chems up to temp, so I just fill it with warm water. My basement in winter sits at about 65f so I just get the water adjusted to run about 72f, fill the tray, and put in the chems. By experience, I know that in my tray, in my basement, in the winter, when the chems get up to 68f the water in the tray has just about equalized, and things stay around 68 long enough for me to get things done. A degree difference over the course of development won't make a huge difference with B&W. The biggest trick is just to do the same thing every time, so if your development starts at 70 and ends at 68, just try for that to be a consistent part of the process. Consistency is control, and lack of consistency, and introduction of variables is invariably (hehe) why some persons think it is unpredictable alchemy.

  2. #32
    IOS
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    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    In JBrunner's video, (as a point of reference), I'm not sure it's clear how many minutes he has the film in chemicals (not including the developer). How long do you have to do your pre-wash, fixer, post wash, wetting, etc ... or does it say all that on the boxes?

    Each film has a different developing time, you can find a good list of times at digitaltruth.com. You can start out with only developing, stopbath, fixer and then rinse. I just started using a hypo wash after the fixing and dont think that i realy need to use the hypo wash but i cuts down on the rinse time. The info on the film boxes wont give you the developing time for other developers. Fix for 5 to 10 minutes, stop bath 30sec , rinse 30 minutes but with the hypowash you can cut the rinse time down to 5 minutes. Hypo wash 1 to 2 minutes.
    Jim

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by IOS View Post
    Fix for 5 to 10 minutes
    This is an appropriate fix time for non-rapid (sodium thiosulfate) fixers, but if you use a rapid (ammonium thiosulfate) fixer, 2 minutes is probably closer to the mark. Two rules of thumb for fixing time:

    1. Follow the instructions on the product packaging. (This applies to all other chemicals, too.)
    2. Cut off a small piece of film (say, the leader that you have to cut off from 35mm film to load it in most tanks), dunk it in the fixer (in ordinary light and without developing it), and time how long it takes to clear. Fix for twice that time (some people say three times as long for T-grain films).


    I generally use the longer of these two times. For instance, if the fixer instructions say to fix for 2 minutes but the film clears after 30 seconds, I fix for 2 minutes. When you perform the snip test (method #2 above), you should discard the fixer after the film clearing time doubles -- so if it starts out at 30 seconds, discard the fixer once the clearing time reaches 60 seconds. The product instructions should also specify capacity (x 36-exposure 35mm rolls per liter). Note also that the clearing time can vary from one film to another, so you should be sure to use a snip of whatever film you're actually processing, not a snip from a roll of another type of film.

    An unrelated piece of advice: You might want to start out with chemicals all from a single company -- for instance, all Ilford or all Kodak. The reason is twofold: First, you're less likely to be confused by conflicting instructions. Second, if something goes wrong, using a single supplier minimizes the opportunities for that company to point its finger at another company's products should you call for help. As you gain experience, these issues become less important, so mixing and matching suppliers becomes more reasonable.

  4. #34
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    [QUOTE=IOS;571779Fix for 5 to 10 minutes, [/QUOTE]


    10 minutes of fix time is approaching the threshold for altering the density of your negatives. Test the time to clear a piece of film in your fix, and double it.

  5. #35
    IOS
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    10 minutes of fix time is approaching the threshold for altering the density of your negatives. Test the time to clear a piece of film in your fix, and double it.

    I always fix film for 7 minutes no matter what film it is. I never wanted to push it to the max or settle for the fastest so i figured 7 minutes would be good and safe.

  6. #36
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    thanks again,

    i'm going to buy all the gear tomorrow and report back on results. I'll just be conservative and go with the times indicated on packaging for all chems.

    R.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    In JBrunner's video, (as a point of reference), I'm not sure it's clear how many minutes he has the film in chemicals (not including the developer). How long do you have to do your pre-wash, fixer, post wash, wetting, etc ... or does it say all that on the boxes?

    The exact time of development was left out because it varies with the particular film/developer combination. You may find times for common film/developer combos in product documents. If I am trying something new, and just winging it, to check out if I want to invest time and effort into a film or developer, I use The Massive Development Chart at DigitalTruth for a start time. The information is in most cases, very reliable.

    Eventually you may want to determine your own personal film speeds and development times, for a particular film/developer/paper. When you feel confident and consistent, that is the next step, and is ultimately how I determine all exposure and processing regimen for the film/developer/paper combinations I use.

  8. #38
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    Ok, I just got back from Adorama in Manhattan and I bought all the stuff and consulted with the processing guy in the film department. He told me I don't need a thermometer and can do everything at room temperature, but that flies in the face it seems with what all of you guys have said, that I should try to keep temp. constant. So I'm going to use Jason Brunner's method of keeping everything in a water bath.

    Digital truth tells me that if I'm developing Neopan 400 in HC-110 I need to use Dilution B formula and develop for 5 minutes at 20 Celsius. On the concentrate bottle of HC 110 it says Working Dilution B is 1 part stock solution to 7 parts water.

    So this means once I get my stock solution (I have no idea how to do this because I'm a math idiot) I take, say, 1 cup of it and mix it with 7 cups of water and the resulting mixture is what I use to develop?

    And the guy at the store said I can re-use the developer. How many times can I re-use it?

    Please tell me I'm on the right track here ...

    Good news: I figured out how to load my reels correctly in the dark!

  9. #39
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    Hmmm, I don't know about not needing to know temperature. Room temps can vary and using HC110 this can mean several minutes difference in developing times. I find the easiest thing to do is mix working solution for HC110. Just do 1 oz of HC110 per quart for dilution B or 1/2 oz for dilution H. I have never tried reusing it. It lasts a LONG time. I got about 50 rolls out of one bottle using both dilutions and that was mostly shotting 120. Neopan and HC110 is my usual combo. let me know if you have any questions.

    Here's you development times for diltuion B. Double them for dilution H:

    -----------------------18C/64F----------20C/68F----------22C/72F----------24C/75F----------26C/79F
    ISO 400-------------------6----------------5---------------4 1/4-------------3 1/2---------------3
    Last edited by Xia_Ke; 01-13-2008 at 11:14 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    flickr

    "A good photograph is one that makes the viewer so aware of the subject that they are unaware of the print."- Kodak
    "...if you find afterwards that you made a mistake, the price of the film and chemicals was...tuition!" - greybeard
    "The hard part isn’t the decisive moment or anything like that – it’s getting the film on the reel!" - John Szarkowski

  10. #40
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    Here are some small pieces of advice. Other people do things other ways, of course, and nobody is really right or wrong.

    HC110- Don't bother mixing the intermediate working solution, its much easier to mix it in small quantities direct from the bottle.

    Here is a web page with good hc110 info:

    http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110/

    And also a handy direct dilution chart from Bob Fowler:

    http://mysite.verizon.net/fowler/photo/hc110.htm

    Use it one shot, meaning mix up your developer, use it, and dump it. You can reuse it and even replenish it but for the small cost, using it one shot assures the utimate in consistency.

    Same for the temperature thing- you can process at "room temperature" and get along ok, OTO you can make sure your temperatures are as consistent as you can make them, and be that much more in control of your process. You can get by, because there is some forgiveness inherent to the technology, but if you are looking to really dominate your process, and eventually turn out the finest prints possible, you gotta grab it by the pistachios, and consistent control is your grip.
    Last edited by JBrunner; 01-13-2008 at 11:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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