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  1. #1
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    How was 8x10 SS Kodak tank used?

    I bought on eBay years ago, for 'someday', a deep stainless steel tank, Kodak 8x10 IIRC.

    I then read they are chemistry hogs & got more interested in trays & a Unicolor drum.

    What kind of support mechanism was used with such tanks? Kind of tall & thin & easy to knock over...probably a trigger-happy bid on my part I guess. :rolleyes:
    Murray

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Depends on how wide it is. Most that I've seen are freestanding, but I've seen some that are designed to sit in a water jacket.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #3
    richard ide's Avatar
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    Mine are 1 gallon tanks (about 2.5" thick in the other dimension). Very economical with chemistry if you replenish the developer. I can develop 24 4 x 5 negatives at a time or 6 8 x 10. Would not be without them.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  4. #4
    CBG
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    Another vote for the 1 gallon 6x10 tanks.

    C

  5. #5
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    They're considerably harder to knock over when fully loaded with chemistry. 1 gallon weighs what, 8 lbs? And if you think a 1 gallon tank is tough, try one of the Kodak hard rubber 8x10 tanks - they hold 3.5 gallons. The stainless one was most likely intended to be used in a "production line" in a water jacket, with replenishment.

  6. #6

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    I received a bunch of the 3.5 gallon tanks from a fellow APUGger. Considering 4x5 is the largest I currently shoot they're only worth bringing out when I've got a LOT of film to process!

  7. #7
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Both the 1 gallon and 3.5 gallon tanks were designed to fit into a water jacket or SS sink. In fact, there were special sinks designed for these tanks.

    The 1 gallon tanks used SS 8x10 holders, but the 3.5 gallon tanks held either holders or saran baskets that held up to 24 sheets of film or paper. If you used holders, there was a top insert for either tank that spaced the holders apart to avoid scratching.

    Kodak and other companies made nitrogen spargers for both types of tank for agitation with nitrogen burst.

    PE

  8. #8
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    Thank you. I was imagining a water jacket around it.

    Lifting a 3.5 gallon one to empty it (oh, duh, that's why you need a sink) would not be fun for people with no running water/drainage in their DR.
    Murray

  9. #9
    jp80874's Avatar
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    I use the one gallon ss tanks as a distilled water dip before hanging sheets to dry. This is after developing five sheets of 8x10 in a Jobo Expert tank.

    John Powers

  10. #10
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    I used the 3.5 gallon SS tanks for developing 18 rolls of 120 using a rack to lift them all out at once. I had several tanks lined up in the sink with a water jacket using a pipe in the drain so it would overflow a couple inches. I also had a rack to hold several sheets of LF film that was loaded in to the hangers. The system worked well, but you do need to use a replenishment type developer to make it economical. This was done for a studio, so we used a lot of film, often 36 rolls a week or more. Not a high count by studio standards, but it was high end, so volume is all relative.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

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