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  1. #11

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    I am not familiar with the Nova processor, but if you can load the exposed paper in a lightight cassette then walk across the hall that's fine. I exposed my paper in the darkroom but after loading the paper in the print drum, I turn on the light and walk to the bathroom for the wet steps.

  2. #12
    jp80874's Avatar
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    What about ventilation? That sounds like a pretty small place to spend a lot of time with fumes. If there is a bathroom fan that is noisy you might want to replace it with a super quiet Panosonic brand. If you do add a powerful exhaust fan where is your fresh air going to come from? Will it be dark and filtered? A lot of dust can come in under the door. If you could build a box to hold a furnace filter in the door the air coming in might be cleaner and darker.

    John Powers

  3. #13
    evilhomer78's Avatar
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    Here is what I'm doing because my bathroom is to small and impossible to light proof.

    I have a spare bedroom that I have light proofed. In the bedroom I have my enlarger as well as a table with 4 trays (dev, stop, fix, holding bath).

    I do all of my processing in the bedroom and once I'm done I carry my finished prints in a tray to the bathroom shower where I wash the prints in a print washer.

  4. #14

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    jp80874,

    Yes, I plan to install a better Panasonic vent fan than the stock unit, and and also a lightproof vent in the bathroom door, but a furnace filter over the lightproof vent on the outside of the bathroom door sounds like an excellent idea, I will probably do that. My idea for the Nova processor comes from the size of my bathroom, 60 inches by 100 inches, including the surface area of the tub. I would save a lot of space with me planning on sometimes doing 12x16 prints, and it would leave the tub for final washing. I suppose I could fit 3 trays on a shelf on the tub, but no room for anything else in the tub area. When I was done processing prints, I would have to take the shelf down, empty and wash out the trays, take out the shelf on the tub etc, before I could do any print washing. My hallway is too short and narrow for placing the enlarger in the hall; interesting idea, though. Thanks to all who have made an effort to help.

  5. #15

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    Akki14,
    You mention blacking everything out. Do you mean the windows? What do you use to lightproof the windows? In my circumstance, it would have to look acceptable to the outside(condo rules) with a white or off-white look from the outside.
    Thanks

  6. #16
    mgonzale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dustmite View Post
    Akki14,
    You mention blacking everything out. Do you mean the windows? What do you use to lightproof the windows? In my circumstance, it would have to look acceptable to the outside(condo rules) with a white or off-white look from the outside.
    Thanks
    Depending on how you have your blinds installed on your window, you may be able to have regular window treatments showing to the outside while you have your "dark" material on the inside. With my recessed window, this is how I deal with the issue of how it looks from the outside.

    I like this thread--I may have more elbow room if I put my enlarger in another room and keep the bathroom as the whole wet side. Interesting.

  7. #17

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    Yes, my windows are recessed, and I could do what I've seen recommended in other posts, using velcro tape around the window opening and using blackout fabric. I think I'd have to have velcro sewn onto the fabric, which is no biggie, and I would have to staple black felt around the doorframe of my front door, cover the peep hole, and unplug the electronics that have little lights while I'm printing, but now I'm thinking of having the enlarger in my living room next to the bathroom! Now I'll have to get an enlarger that will work well and also look cool.....

  8. #18
    Akki14's Avatar
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    Blackout fabric (which is white on both sides) with sticky-backed velcro around the edges of the window frame (which comes off easily because it's a plastic-type window frame. In fact it can come off too easily sometimes). I then put a bit of black gaffa tape around that which occasionally needs a little squish-down before a printing session but only if I'm working during the day. I have my own sewing machine so sewing the velcro to the blackout fabric wasn't a problem but it does leave tiny holes in the blackout material hence the extra layer of gaffa tape which also helps seal it all. I can still open said window since it's a swing-out/book-open type window so I can get even more ventilation if needed in an emergency.
    If you're only doing paper, you don't need complete total blackout, not like panchromatic film processing in trays or anything. I use a piece of folded over gaffa tape around some of the doors to create a sort of flappy lightseal which works pretty good, but I only did that when I started tray developing enlarged negatives onto panchromatic film.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  9. #19
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    One point that hasn’t been mentioned in this thread that may be relevant is that there is no need to develop paper immediately after exposure. I can be left several days, or longer in a light proof container if need be. So you could expose a number of sheets, and develop them at a later date elsewhere without detriment.
    Not sure if that helps, but just thought I’d throw it into the discussion.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  10. #20

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    Dave's covered it really. I was going to say: Expose a number of sheets, place each in the same spare photo paper box, put top on, carry across the passageway to darkroom and open in safelight conditions. If the paper was smaller than the 12x16 quad you should be able to do two prints at a time in the slot using two hands. The simple papersafe with a "lockable" hinged lid is even safer. Jessops in the U.K. did one and there must be others making such safes. That way if you drop the safe on your way across there's no harm done. I used to carry my paper to each night class session in just such a papersafe in broad daylight with no problems.

    pentaxuser

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