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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    These machines are very capable of drying RC papers, I worked alongside a commercial advertising photographer for many years and he used a rotary glazer for all his RC prints, often doing many hundreds of prints a day. I had one myself and used it for drying FB papers, but stopped because I didn't feel that the canvas was clean enough for archival prints.

    Ian

  2. #12
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    I can't agree or disagree with the idea of drying RC with such a dryer.

    I have to say that at EK when RC was first introduced we had a lot of complaints about the RC sticking to the drum or to the canvas. Therefore, we said in our publications that RC should not be dried face up (emulsion) side to the drum, and if dried face down, the heat should be set to a low value. At this time, I forget that value, but it was much lower than normal.

    At the same time, the dry mount tissue was changed as were the dry mount temperature recommendations. It was for the same reason. The resin could melt when it hit the press or the paper and create quite a mess.

    So, do what works but recognize that RC can melt. That is how the paper is made. Resin is melted and extruded through two hoppers into contact with a moving web of paper to make a sandwich of resin/paper/resin.

    Ecess resin was coated, made into chips and remelted to conserve resin. It was then blended with fresh resin and used for coating. This cycle went on. The point being that the resin can be easily melted.

    PE

  3. #13
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    When I first saw a rotary glazer being used for RC prints I was horrified, all the data-sheets, said don't use them under any circumstances.

    But with the heat turned down slightly, and at a faster than usual rotation speed there were no problems. I did see the occasional prints stuck to the chrome when someone inadvertently put a print through with the emulsion facing the drum, or when someone had tampered with the speed or temperature settings, but with care the print could easily be removed without damaging the chrome
    surface. My photographer friend preferred to use his rotary glazer because it was a lot faster than the conventional RC paper driers then available, also he was a bit mean and was happier using what he already owned.

    Ian

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