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  1. #21

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    As a byproduct, the candle soot can be combined w/epoxy resin for touching up those little dings on your camera. It covers brass very nicely with a semi-gloss black finish.
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  2. #22
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    From "A Popular Treatise on Photography" by Désiré van Monckhoven, 1863 :

    "The dark chamber ought to be, on the contrary, very simple. Two or three tables are sufficient, and the light should either be entirely excluded by pasting black paper over the windows, and the operations conducted by the light of a candle or a gas jet, surrounded by a square lantern of yellow glass, or else, as often preferred, the dark room is so arranged that the light comes exclusively through a frame of yellow glass about 10 inches by 8 inches, and this covered with a sheet of very thin white paper, in order to impede the passage of the direct solar rays. A hinged frame is fitted in front of this square of yellow glass in such a way as to admit of its being totally or partially covered, in order to diminish or increase the amount of illumination at pleasure."

    I've also recently read of early photographers working solely by the light of an unshielded candle several meters away from the plate, but I can't remember the reference. (Perhaps an issue of the Philadelphia Photographer?) Given the low color temperature of a candle flame, the low level of illumination, distance, and the restricted spectral and overall sensitivity of collodion, I can imagine a bare candle might have actually been OK for very brief periods.


    Joe

  3. #23
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    I think Smieglitz probably wins a prize.

    Early photosensitive materials were not panchromatic. Green's 'Primitive Photography' with non-achromat lenses talks about correcting for actinic focus in the blue region...just like the alternative processes we turn back to today.

    Yellow makes sense as the safelight color before electricity as they didn't need to go all the way to the red spectrum.

    All the other reasons not to aside...
    Murray

  4. #24
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    Screw the romance thing, go for a red lit world domination lab! Safer, and just as cool.

  5. #25
    mjs
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    At an estate auction some time back I purchased an enlarging outfit from approximately 1908. The outfit was for 1.25" square glass plates (had tiny little trays and a tiny little paper easel and everything!) The box it came in converted to a darkroom light: there was a place to hold a candle and red tissue paper over a round hole cut into the wood. The inside top of the box had a tin lid which left a gap around the edges for the smoke to pass through. This thing just shouted "fire hazard" to me, but the older farts were tougher, I suppose. Yes, it had been used.

    I'm not a historian, so I sold it on E-bay. It was just the cutest little outfit, though. Came with a tiny rectangular camera and a box of little glass plates.

    Mike

  6. #26

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    There are also Kerosene Lanterns
    http://www.boxcameras.com/kerolights.html

    And you can cover the windows to a room with several layers of red material and do you darkroom work by daylight. Mentioned in a book I was reading recently.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Murray@uptowngallery View Post
    I think Smieglitz probably wins a prize...
    I'm afraid to ask...

  8. #28
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    I'm still working on making red screens for my kitchen windows so I can use it in daylight hours without having to put up blackouts. Photographers did this in the early days, no reason it shouldn't be done today.

    To the cotdt, there is no reason a candle in a red enclosure shouldn't work. A better way would be to acquire a Davy lamp and put some red gel film (or similar) around the glass.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  9. #29

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    Item number: 120226662280
    quick! 9 minutes to go...........

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wishy View Post
    "Does the smell of fix turn you on"
    That didn't work in high school I seriously doubt it'll work better now Just one more reason to hate acid fixer

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