Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,971   Posts: 1,558,663   Online: 1026
      
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    ZoneIII's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    247
    Images
    35

    Very dumb questions about Jobo Expert drum. I'm almost embarrassed to ask!

    I have a really dumb question and also a second minor question about my new Jobo 3010 Expert drum.

    1)I haven't used and Expert drum before. Before I bought it, I was searching for related information and I came across a thread, possibly on APUG but I'm not sure, where someone said that the film should be inserted into the tubes emulsion side OUT. To me, emulsion side out would mean that it is against the walls of the tube that is the normal meaning of "out" when something is bent. I thought I mis-read it so I re-read it a couple times and, sure enough!, the person said that the film should be in the tubes emulsion side out. That doesn't make sense to me so I read the rest of the thread expecting someone to correct the mistake but nobody did. The Jobo website says nothing about this nor does the instructions that came with the drum but logic and common sense tell me that the film has to be inserted emulsion side IN. Would somebody please confirm that?

    I believe it was in the same thread that someone said that the tubes are oval-shaped, not circular, so the film doesn't actually touch the tube's walls allowing chemistry to reach both sides of the film. But the tubes do appear to be perfectly round on my new 3010 - visually, at least, and the film does touch the tube's walls. It appears that a limited amount of chemistry can get behind it to remove the anti-halation layer but that's about it.

    2) My other question is minor but I might as well ask it. The instructions that came with the tank say that the film must be pushed to the bottom of the tubes when loading but the Jobo site says that the film should only be pushed till it's flush with the top of the tubes. The difference is only about 1/2" and I can't see where it would make a big difference but I thought I would ask which is the preferred method.

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    SE London.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    585
    Images
    22
    1. There's no such thing as a dumb question.
    2. The film should have the emulsion facing into the void; ie not flush against the sides of the tank. Having said that, I've made mistakes in the past (with B&W) with no noticeable effect.
    3. I find that if the film is pushed too far down it can be difficult to retrieve, a couple of mms will ensure it wont get caught by the lid.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago, Western Suburbs
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,444
    Dear Zonelll,

    Here is a link to the instructions: http://www.jobousadarkroom.com/instr...g%20the%20Drum

    Neal Wydra

  4. #4
    ZoneIII's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    247
    Images
    35
    Thanks! I was virtually positive that the emulsion should be "in" but the post in the thread that I mentioned and the fact that nobody corrected it made me just want to make sure I wasn't nuts!

    I've only had the drum for a couple hours now but I have already learned something about it. I can remove the lid with no problem without the pump. Of course, there are probably variances in lid tightness from drum to drum. But I also tried something that was suggested in a forum - that is, I simply put a hose in the top and filled the tank while I cupped my hand around the hose to loosely seal the the hose in the hole. The top simply lifted off with no problem at all once the tank was full. I will just get a rubber stopper that fits the opening and has a hole drilled in it for the hose. I'm lucky in that I have a science store right down the street that has exactly what I need - right size with the hole in it already. I have numerous hoses in my darkroom sink so I don't have to add anything. KISS!

    Now, if I wanted a pump.... I am a hopeless tinkerer who always enjoys finding a readily available substitute for a "special" item when the substitue will work as good or better than the "official" item and it costs less. Most photographers that I know feel the same - especially those who work in darkrooms. John Sexton loves finding things in hardware stores that substitute for "special" things. That said, you can get foot pump from Walmart or any similar store that, if anything, is better than the Jobo pump and it costs a fraction of what the Jobo pump costs. It's used for inflating air mattresses, etc. All you need then is the rubber stopper mentioned above. If I make one, I will warm the hose up and insert an oversize brass compression fitting with an ID the same as the hose's ID into the hose under the stopper so the stopper won't come off of the hose under pressure.

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,227
    Images
    65
    IIRC, there were ads from Jobo for netting to go against the base side of the film to lift it away from the back of the tube. This apparently allowed solution to get behind the film and wash away the backing layer materials, if any. It also prevented the film from sticking to the drum. I've also heard of people having a net pattern on films developed with it. This was years ago though, when they first introduced the 3000 series.

    I use mine to do paper, and the paper is easy to insert and remove. I have put the paper in flush with the top and pushed to the bottom and seen no apparent difference.

    When using the pump, I have had the lid fly off with considerable force on several occasions, so be careful. When lifiting it, use your right hand to support the back of the drum or you can crack the lift lever or its mount. The drum is heavy!

    PE

  6. #6
    ZoneIII's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    247
    Images
    35
    Thanks guys!

    Neal, thanks, but the drum I bought is brand new and came with instructions and, as I mentioned, I had been to the Jobo site and read the instructions they have there. I asked the question because the two sources say to different things.

    Photo Engineer - Thanks. I have heard that it can fly off. As I mentioned, I don't think I will have any need for the pump because I can get the top off quite easily using nothing at all and, if it ever is tight, I will just use water from a hose as I mentioned. It worked beautifully when I tried it today. It' didn't even pop. Once the tank was full, the moderate pressure just lifted it up and off as nice and gentle as can be. I can see why air pressure could make it pop, though, because air compresses while water doesn't. With water, it's a nice, even mechanical lift. But if I did want an air pump, I would just get one at Walmart as I mentioned.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    398
    Just a minor point; as you have seen the cylinder walls aren't oval, but the diameter in the middle is greater than the diameter at the ends like the columns on the greek (roman?) temples. This is what stops the film sticking. I have pulled the back off a 3010 to fix a leak and it is more obvious from behind.

    FWIW I always try to put the film emulsion side in, but even though I'm sure I have got it wrong now and again I don't recall having any issues. I started out without a pump and was able to get the lid off without too much effort. Then I got a pump with a 3005 and I must admit it is much easier. I expect that a foot pump from a camping supplies place with an improvised rubber stopper would do the job just as well.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin