Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,966   Posts: 1,523,358   Online: 1119
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
  1. #1
    scarfish69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Colonial Heights, Va.
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4

    Steel, for reel?

    Help, please?!
    I'm hoping today is the day things change for me. I use plastic reels. Sometimes (it seems like rarely) the film goes on like a charm. Other times, it's like there's a curse on me. It can take hours to just load one roll of film. The strange thing is, tonight when I was having problems, I brought the reel out into the light. A practice roll of film went on just fine. I'm tired of getting to the point where I just want to smash the reels and canister.
    Now, I've read some posts. Are the steel reels as easy (with practice) and reliable as some seem to think? Again, I use a plastic canister, so I'm used to twirling for agitation. Is the agitation method different for steel canisters? If you buy good reels can you buy a cheap canister?
    Lead retrievers seem like a great thing, are they? Any chance of scratching?
    Thanks for reading and replying!

  2. #2
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,096
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    52
    I now use steel reels almost all the time. The trick is to use the quality brands (like Hewes), and to make sure the film is centred correctly on the clip. After that it is a breeze. So, I am pretty sure they are easier than plastic. For steel reels and tanks you will be using inversion rather than twirling. Yes, the reels are more important than the tank, so you can get a cheaper tank such as one with a plastic lid. Lead retrievers are great and no, they don't scratch the film, well yes they do, but just the bit before the images.

  3. #3
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,096
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    52
    By the way, welcome to APUG.

  4. #4
    geauxpez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    107
    It sounds like you have the Spanish-made plastic tank and reel kit with the "twirling rod" thingy to spin the reels. I had problems using the same kit. I switched to the Paterson tank & reels (also plastic) which you typically agitate by inversion. I find that those reels load much easier.

    Do you load your reels inside a changing bag? That's what I use and I found that if I keep my arms in there too long struggling with the film, it makes the reels harder to load as things get warmer & more humid with sweat. I now slide some cardboard inside to make a frame of sorts which makes the space inside larger and cooler.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    87
    I think steel reels are much easier, but like anything else, they take some learning. Generally steel tanks and reels are somewhat smaller than plastic, so if you are using a changing bag, you'll gain a bit of room. Steel is easier to dry between runs than plastic, for either, they must be absolutely dry before use, or you will have problems with the film sticking. On the other hand, steel is a bit more fragile than plastic, in that they are susceptible to bending when dropped, especially on concrete floors. It doesn't take very much bending to render the reel unusable.
    Yes, the agitation method is different, instead of twirling the reel inside the take you cap the top and gently invert the tank to agitate. Many plastic reel systems use the inversion method as well.
    Don't get too hung up on brand, they all work about the same. Used ones are plentiful now, and inexpensive, sometimes free, just check them out carefully before committing a roll of film in the dark. You'll want some practice anyway.

  6. #6
    Dave Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Middle England
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,894
    Images
    2
    The Paterson tanks also come with a "twirling rod" so you have the option of inverting or spinning the reels. I'm a spinner.

    As for the choice between plastic and steel reels it seems that half the world uses steel, and the other half have learnt to load plastic. However the comments above about working in sweaty changing bags is worth noting, it seems, from what you say that could be the root of your problem.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  7. #7
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,096
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    52
    I didn't see any comment about changing bags from the original poster.

  8. #8
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,239
    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    Don't get too hung up on brand, they all work about the same.
    The Hewes mentioned earlier don't work the same way for 35mm as most other steel reels. They have a set of two "pins" that grab the sprockets on the film. This aligns the film properly for feeding in a way that's much easier for a beginner (and non-beginners as well) to load than trying to center the film on a clip by feel in the dark. The Hewes have larger gauge wire as well, which makes the loading more positive and the reel sturdier, less prone to being permanently bent.

    Hewes reels are not cheap, but they do have distinct advantages.

    Lee
    Last edited by Lee L; 05-06-2008 at 11:56 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Westport, MA.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,056
    I've smashed a plastic reel before under similar circumstances.. I did switch to stainless (Hewes 120 and Kinderman 35mm reels). It's worth it. Atleast it was for me. 35mm is tricky at first, the Kinderman has two sharp teeth that puncture the film to hold it in. Once you get the hang of it, it's easy and you can load it wet/damp.. There's also a loader for the kinderman 35mm reels that works real well.

  10. #10
    BennehBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Huddersfield, England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    46
    I've found the key to loading plastic reels is to simply stay calm, the calmer I am (usually aided with an alcoholic beverage) the easier it goes, less time, less sweat, less sticking.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin