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Thread: print dryer?

  1. #1
    Sean's Avatar
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    Here is a print dryer for sale in NZ. I am wondering if it would come in handy or is not really needed. Has anyone ever used a device like this? Thanks for any feedback, Sean

    http://www.trademe.co.nz/structure/a...asp?id=5157536

  2. #2
    lee
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    for fliber base print drying just get some plastic window screening and dry the prints on it with air. should take about 4 or 5 hours. Basically overnite. Don't fool with them until dry. Dry them face down and it will help minimize the curling. Squeegee each side on glass before putting them on the screens.

    lee\c

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    I've used similar ones several years ago. Basically it's a curved metal platen with a heating coil strung underneath it. (The one you linked is two-sided). The apron clamps tightly over the print holding it flat in contact with the heated surface. The prints tend to dry pretty flat with maybe just some edge ripple. The two-sided ones can be loaded on both sides and flipped, but of course the top side dries fastest so you have to work out a system for loading,flipping and removing the dried prints (or you can just use it one-sided and not bother). So all in all, it is probably faster than air drying but the trade-off is that it requires more tending. The problems are: possible fixer contamination of the apron over time and some archivalists used to scream bloody murder at the mere mention of heat drying (which is odd since I rarely heard them bitch vehemently about dry mounting).
    Often the platens are actually ferrotype tins if you are into that. For that you squeegee the prints face down onto the perfectly clean, polished plates and leave the apron up. When they pop off, they're done.
    Hope this helps.

    -Neal
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  5. #5
    Sean's Avatar
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    thanks guys, doesn't look like it's worth the trouble and risk for faster drying.

  6. #6

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    I'm assuming the prices are NZ dollars. Those print drums [I think Beseler ] might be a good deal if in good condition. You can use those for film to right?

  7. #7
    ann
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    Noooo , Nooooooo for film. Dryers for film are cabinets, with a fan and heat device, along with filters at the top. Hanging film by clips on a wire or bar running cross wise in the cabinet. Or, some form of the above.

  8. #8

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    No I meant the beseler colour print drums. Don't some people use them to develop film? The price for the two isn't very high.

  9. #9
    ann
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    sorry I misunderstood. Some folks do use the drums for film. Similar to the Jobo style of development. You would need a motor base, or roll on a table top. Never tried that myself, but know it is done.

  10. #10

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    Not worth the trouble. The UofA darkroom just uses the plastic screen method.

    Actually what they did was pretty neat....

    On the opposite wall is a slab of lucite bolted to the wall with a length of rubber hose attached on the bottom to collect the runoff (and a hose from there goes to a bucket on the floor). You squeegee off on this, and then transfer to the screens on the other side.

    The screens are a neat design. They are mounted on rails in rows under the light table. Each pulls out and in a small area you can get a TON of racks. Much better than making room for ANOTHER piece of equipment....
    Official Photo.net Villain
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