Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,526   Posts: 1,543,916   Online: 1087
      
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 41
  1. #1
    nsurit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,268
    Images
    17

    Paint for darkroom?

    After having celebrated 63 birthdays, I have the good fortune of building my first new home and my first wet darkroom. Oh, I've had homes in the past, just not one I had built for me. The darkroom is the first I've had that I could call my own. The walls will be sheetrock and I'm wondering what paint anyone might suggest. Obviously I'd like something that would hold it own against a little moisture and perhaps the occasional chemical splash. The standard treatment for sheetrock is a bit of texture applied after installation. This would seem to me to be a not so good idea in a darkroom. So any ideas of texture/no texture and type of paint for the walls? Bill Barber

  2. #2
    Frank Szabo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Broken Arrow, Oklahoma
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    312
    I'd say 'no' to any texture and paint it any color you wish as long as it's flat black.
    ...

    "Beer is proof that God wants us to be happy."

    Benjamin Franklin

  3. #3
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,101
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    52
    The paint can be any colour you wish. There is no real need in a true darkroom to paint the walls black. Some people do take some precautions by painting a strip of wall in line with the enlarger or just the neg carrier in black.

  4. #4
    Dave Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Middle England
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,894
    Images
    2
    Any colour you like as long as it's white. It will be black when the lights are off, and orange when the safe lights are on.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  5. #5
    david b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    None of your business
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,034
    Images
    30
    There is sheet rock that is made for bathroom areas and is somewhat moisture resistant. I would suggest that.

    As for paint and color, my darkroom is white except around the enlarger, which is painted black, including the ceiling about the enlarger.

  6. #6
    Sparky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,100
    I would suggest a HIGH QUALITY paint. Like Pratt and Lambert - it's super thick and quite gloppy (almost like a gel) but you only need HALF the coats you would with something like that home depot behr stuff. It has a super high quality pigment too - that's just more pleasing to the eye. I used a matte surface - and it wipes off great. It's real latex!

    You don't need ANYTHING SPECIAL as far as sheet rock goes. 5/8" type x firecode works just dandy. The protection's all in the paint. Just use a good primer.

    As for color - I did my darkroom in a deep yellow, my easels are red (i.e. floor vacuum easel) - since I figure this way - it keeps the ambient lighting with safelight bright enough to see what you're doing - but reflections get the blue component removed and are thus not detrimental to the print - provided you're not doing any RA4 prints...

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Dublin
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    42
    Use a good bathroom paint, It'll wipe better and resist moisture more effectively, Colour's are all in the eye of the beholder,, what about a nice 18% grey?

  8. #8
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,380
    Images
    174
    I used black board paint, best thing i could have done its matte black so if there is any chance of a stray beam of light its going to be eaten by the wall rather than dispersing and possibly causing an issue on a white wall.

  9. #9
    mmcclellan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan (USA)
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    463
    In a DARKroom, any light that is in there by definition should be SAFE. Therefore, you will probably want to have the best reflectance possible in the wall paint to make the room as bright as possible. In every darkroom I've had over the years, the walls were always white, usually glossy latex so it could easily be wiped down -- especially around the wet area. In the dry area, it does not matter if it's matte or glossy.

    But I would definitely go with pure white unless you just have a burning desire for a particular color. Keep in mind, of course, that under safelights the colors will all change anyway, so white is a safe bet and any reflectances will still be the same color as the safelight.

    The only place I would ever use matte black is right around the enlarger, but unless your enlarger is really throwing off a lot of light or it's a communal darkroom and people are close to each other (with little enlarger booths), I would not even use black around the enlarger. The amount of light thrown off by the enlarger will have to be quite substantial to fog your paper during the exposure when the paper is actually out.

    Easy way to test for that, though, is to put a sheet in the easel, lay a coin or two in the middle of it, cap your enlarger lens, and turn it on for a minute or so, then develop the paper and see if the outlines of the coins are visible.

    Congratulations on getting the darkroom! You've waited quite a while for this, so use it well!
    Michael McClellan
    Documentary Photographer
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    http://www.MichaelMcClellan.com

  10. #10
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Don't worry too much about it. That's what the architect is paid and responsible for. He or she, if properly trained, experienced, and worth his or her weight in salt, will either know what specs to call for in a home darkroom, or be able to easily reference them in a variety of texts, and/or tap other sources (colleagues, professional photographers, etc.) for the info, and then communicate this effectively to the building contractor. There should be a darkroom section in any architectural standards book published in the last 50 years of the last century. I can see working with the architect on the basic water and storage requirements, and basic layout of the space, but I wouldn't go so far as to tell him/her what paint you are going to need.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 07-08-2008 at 05:50 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin