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  1. #1

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    5x7 daylight processing

    I’m thinking about doing a little 5x7…problem is, I have no darkroom. So I need a daylight developing solution for 5x7 negs.
    So far, all I see is a Jobo pro tank for $300. I can’t swing that.
    Any other options?

  2. #2
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    A Unicolor tank, or a Beseler tank if it has all the ribs works for 2 at a time.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  3. #3

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    I use the Jobo print tanks (58xx series) for processing 5x7 and larger film. These can generally be picked up second-hand for a fraction of their cost new.

    Either that, or try the "taco" method. Roll the sheet of film into a loose tube, emulsion side in, and pop an elastic band round to hold it. Then process in a normal daylight tank.

    Or, check out the BTZS tubes. Though I believe that these would require a room you could make light tight for filling with solutions (also check out this thread on BTZS tube usage).
    Steve

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    Where to find these things?
    I checked B&H and Adorama...neither offers anything.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by snallan View Post
    I use the Jobo print tanks (58xx series) for processing 5x7 and larger film. These can generally be picked up second-hand for a fraction of their cost new.

    Either that, or try the "taco" method. Roll the sheet of film into a loose tube, emulsion side in, and pop an elastic band round to hold it. Then process in a normal daylight tank.

    Or, check out the BTZS tubes. Though I believe that these would require a room you could make light tight for filling with solutions (also check out this thread on BTZS tube usage).
    How are the print tanks adapted for negatives?

  6. #6
    Ole
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    JOBO 2830 print drum works fine for me. Even with E6.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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  7. #7

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    A paterson orbital will also work - two sheets of 5x7 at a time, and you only need 150ml of developer solution.

    Best place to find one is ebay UK, or try Retrophotographic if you don't feel like gambling Expect to pay GBP20-40 on ebay, closer to GBP55 from Retrophotographic.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by dazedgonebye View Post
    How are the print tanks adapted for negatives?
    The tanks are used straight, no modifications. The difference between the Jobo film tanks, and the print tanks, is that the print tanks have a series of ribs running along the length of the tank. These hold the paper in place during agitation, and therefore do the same for sheets of film. (The print drums still take the Jobo reels for roll film development, so they can be used for both roll film and sheet film development.)

    If you are only processing one sheet of film at a time, using a Jobo film drum will be fine. But if you want to process several sheets at once, they can move around in a film drum, and can end up overlapping. The ribs in the print tanks hold the film better, and prevent movement. For additional security, Jobo produced separators that clip over the ribs giving more support to sheets of paper/film. Unfortunately these now seem to be becoming as rare as hens teeth!

    Quote Originally Posted by dazedgonebye View Post
    Where to find these things?
    I get most of my Jobo kit from ebay.
    Last edited by snallan; 07-13-2008 at 07:19 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Adding my source of equipment
    Steve

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  9. #9
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
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    You can process 6 5x7s at a time
    in a Jobo 3006. If you are willing
    to tape two 5x7s into a single 7x10
    sheet, you can process 10 5x7s in
    a Jobo 3005.

  10. #10
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    You might try the Jobo print tubes first and see if that works well enough using the standard ribs as separators. Takes a little practice but the print drums are relatively inexpensive. The 3000 series film tanks still sell at high prices.

    After that, try making your own processing tubes in the style of BTZS tubes. You still need a darkroom of sorts (e.g. a bathroom with a dim light) but this would be the cheapest method. Also, tubes allow you to use different development times or eve different developers/dilutions for each sheet of film. There have been several DIY threads here about making tubes.
    Jerold Harter MD

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