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  1. #1
    Jersey Vic's Avatar
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    US Products for cleaning an old enlarger

    I'm cleaning up the old Durst S-45 that sat idle for 5 years or so and I'm thinking of using Simple green on the outside surfaces and WD-40 on the column and other friction areas where some old grease has dried out. Good idea? Disaster? Thanks in advance

    Victor
    Holga: if it was any more analog, you'd need a chisel.

  2. #2
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey Vic View Post
    I'm cleaning up the old Durst S-45 that sat idle for 5 years or so and I'm thinking of using Simple green on the outside surfaces and WD-40 on the column
    Windex and SAE-30 oil. WD-40 dries out and becomes a sticky mess - great for loosening things that are stuck or getting rusty parts going again - but not for general lubrication. If you need something stronger than Windex use Ronsonol or Zippo lighter fluid.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  3. #3
    reellis67's Avatar
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    As stated above, WD-40 is not a lubricant, so it's not likely your best choice. Simple Green should be safe on the surfaces, it's pretty safe stuff for most all uses. I've never replaced any lubricant on the gears in my enlargers, but if I were to do so, I believe that a SMALL amount of white lithium grease would do. Too much and you'll have dust sticking to it (the reason not to use oil).

    - Randy

  4. #4
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    WD40 is mostly a solvent, so it is pretty good at loosening up and removing gunky grease. Just wipe it all off after with rags/paper towels.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  5. #5
    Curt's Avatar
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    Lubriplate Multi-Purpose Grease is the best you can get, WD40 will clean up the hardened gunk and other hardened materials. Powermatic told me about Lubriplate grease for use on my shaper and cabinet saw gears and mechanisms.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  6. #6
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    Lubriplate Multi-Purpose Grease is the best.
    Very good stuff, but I find it separates over time.

    If you are going out to get something special in the way of grease for photographic use may I suggest Corning High-Vacuum Grease: it is thick and sticks to where it is put; it won't flow under it's own weight; it doesn't separate and throw oil; it doesn't outgas; works over a wide temperature range; etc.. Ideal for re-greasing focusing helicoids.

    Stay far away from 'Lith-Ease', 'Sil-Glide' and generic lithium grease (Panef): they start to come apart as soon as you apply them.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  7. #7
    Jersey Vic's Avatar
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    Thanks alot for the very good and detailed info.
    Holga: if it was any more analog, you'd need a chisel.



 

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