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  1. #11
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I agree Jerold, but....

    1. Jobos are no longer made and support is difficult. I have 2 of them! (before you comment)

    2. What I suggest is easy and inexpensive.

    3. There are other options too.

    PE
    No disagreement.
    Jerold Harter MD

  2. #12
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    PE, as I said, my water gets hotter as time goes on...Can you suggest a good regulator?

  3. #13
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    If you fill a common kitchen sink, either porcelain or stainless, with water at 103F to 6", and put the containers into it with developers, you can maintain the temp with a good thermometer and your manual operation of the sink. It takes about 1 hour to bring 1 gallon from RT to 100F. Aim for 103. Then, at that point, you can begin the process. At 103, the solution will fall to about 98 in the 3 - 7' development time required for C41 or E6 and the average will be about 100F. This will work without a controler.

    There are several controllers listed such as here: http://www.calumetphoto.com/ctl?ac.u...trol&x=10&y=29

    Or, you can try the Powers control valve that we used at Kodak on all sinks.

    There is also a "black box" controller, but I have forgotten the name of the company. It has input from hoses on your sink and you set the temperature on a dial and it regulates hot and cold electronically. Then again, there are used Jobo water baths out there that have a thermostat to control and temper your water and solutions. These are about 2 feet square and have cutouts for the bottles. Commercial circulating baths about 8" deep are also sold.

    Some take extensive plumbing such as the Powers valve and others just plug in.

    PE

  4. #14

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    While I use deep tanks and a deep sink with a water jacket and thermostatic mixing valve for color sheet film, I have quite often over the years developed small quantities of color film (c-41 and e-6) in small tanks using a deep 16x20 hypo tray (6 ") as a water jacket for both the bottles of chemicals and the tank. I regulate the temperature with a thermometer and a standard hot and cold water faucet. It is not difficult as long as you keep the water flow low enough to not run out of hot water. In this situation, I generally have my chemicals mixed up in 1/2 gallon bottles. Gosh, I even developed color slide film in the days of E-3 and E-4 that way in my bathroom.

  5. #15

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    Also, check craigslist.org classifieds. Between the Conn, Boston and New York ones, there's almost always a sink up for grabs somewhere at well below new prices. The temp controllers also turn up, but not as often and not as much of a discount.

  6. #16
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    I know, I see sinks and enlargers etc., but they are almost always just an hour too far for me to be able to convince someone to drive me to get one. :\

    Thanks, everyone. I think I can handle using a thermometor and watching the temperature.

    The Jobo does appeal because I could turn on the lights to use it, though. Their high prices and lack of support make me weary, though.

    Out of curiosity, is this the Powers unit? http://www.powerscontrols.com/pages/...Cat=2218&ref=2

  7. #17
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    That is one type of Powers controller.

    PE

  8. #18
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    If you just need to do film in a tank and need temperature control, then use a water jacket. Depending on your setup, use a tank (e.g. plastic storage tub) or a darkroom tray filled with water. If you have more time than money, use an aquarium heater and aquarium pump to temper and circulate the water. If you can find one, buy a used Dev-Tec heating element with the small aquarium pump. The Dev-Tec units are waterproof and resistant to chemicals. Perhaps $50 used. To cool the water, add ice cubes or else various sizes of the re-usable ice packs for coolers.
    Jerold Harter MD

  9. #19
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    I would say that my time:money ratio is staggering.

    I do have a rather large and deep "work" sink in my laundry room. I could probably make it work if I fitted it with a standpipe and fashioned some kind of crazy water-bath.

  10. #20
    CBG
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    Water baths are pretty standard equipment. A large volume of water holds it's temperature for quite a while and requires less active control than smaller quantities. When I first set up my own darkroom, I used to use a big trough of water as my "temp control" setup. It actually worked pretty well. If you have a tank or tub of a few gallons and get it stabilized at a temperature by simply mixing hot or cold water to be at the right temperature and then keeping it there for a few minutes, it makes a good water bath to keep processing tanks at a well controlled temp.

    A big volume of tempered water is darn useful for washing prints and film in a low tech setup. Just scoop out the tempered water you need into trays / tanks then dump down the drain and refill as many times as needed. Tempering the water is easier since a little hot water added or a little cold added to a large volume won't send the temperature way off. The changes effected are easier to manage.

    Simple metallic dial type thermometers inexpensively available are a cheap way to get started.

    You could fancy it up with an insulated water jacket fabricated with foam insulation, epoxy and fiberglass. I have heard you shouldn't use polyester resin in this instance because I believe I heard polyester resin eats foam. I believe epoxy can coat foam harmlessly.

    If all this works well but you end up eventually wanting the convenience of greater automation, the thermostatic valves etc mentioned here can save you time, but as you noticed the cost reflects the convenience.

    Best,

    C

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